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Sony considers commercial use of idle PS3s

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 11 Apr 2007 5:55 User comments (12)

Sony considers commercial use of idle PS3s Following the strong initial results from the PlayStation 3's (PS3) performance while taking part in the Stanford Folding@Home project, Sony has entered into talks about using the same techniques for commercial uses. The PS3's idle CPU cycles are used to calculate research for the Stanford University project. The overall goal is to understand protein folding, unlocking the mysteries behind life-threatening conditions.
However, the Financial Times has reported that Sony and several companies may be interested in using the same technique for commercial purposes. "We are discussing various options with companies and exploring commercial applications," said Sony's chief technology officer, Masa Chatani. It is estimated that, on average, 10,000 PS3s working in a distributed computing network can match the performance of 200,000 PCs (of course, PC equipment varies considerably so take these figures with a pinch of salt).

"A start-up or a pharmaceutical company that lacks a super-computer could utilize this kind of infrastructure," said Chatani. Of course, Sony would need to come up with some form of incentive for PS3 users to be involved with any commercial distributing-computing project. Maybe finding out how to cure Alzheimer's disease and other conditions that affect millions of people served as incentive enough for 30,000 PlayStation 3 users to sign up for Folding@Home.

Source:
GamesIndustry.biz

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12 user comments

111.4.2007 12:13
vinny13
Inactive

Quote:
It is estimated that, on average, 10,000 PS3s working in a distributed computing network can match the performance of 200,000 PCs (of course, PC equipment varies considerably so take these figures with a pinch of salt).
Excuse me but, holy crap!

211.4.2007 14:21

I'm sorry, but fuck that.

If I pay my hard earned money on a ps3, I expect all of the CPU cycles to be used in doing whatever the hell I'm running/playing on it. Am I the only one who sees potential abuse with this type of technology?

311.4.2007 15:01

Actually, Im a big fan of folding@home, but I dont know about these "commercial uses" I think that might be an abuse

411.4.2007 15:43

as long as its a option sony might be hurting for moeny but for people on a limited net they need every bit of bandwidth for thier own stuff.

511.4.2007 16:13

If Sony instituted some kind of profit sharing or a reward system I would be game. For example: Want Tekken 5? $19 or 30 hours of computing.

611.4.2007 16:21

Originally posted by MrGrimace:
If Sony instituted some kind of profit sharing or a reward system I would be game. For example: Want Tekken 5? $19 or 30 hours of computing.
now that is innovation!!!
^^

711.4.2007 16:51

Originally posted by MrGrimace:
If Sony instituted some kind of profit sharing or a reward system I would be game. For example: Want Tekken 5? $19 or 30 hours of computing.
And they would sell your 30hrs of computing to Company XYZ for 25$/hr.

For real.

811.4.2007 18:55

Originally posted by hikaricor:
I'm sorry, but fuck that.
If I pay my hard earned money on a ps3, I expect all of the CPU cycles to be used in doing whatever the hell I'm running/playing on it. Am I the only one who sees potential abuse with this type of technology?
Well I'm sure all ps3 owners would love to be using 100% of their ps3 100% of the time, but that's not very possible, now is it?
As stated in the article, it is concerning idle cpu cycles. That is, cycles you weren't using, and will never be able to use.
I say more power to everyone.

Then again, I guess I can see how helping others might make some people angry. Scrooge.

And I do see the potential for abuse. I don't see a reality. Especially from Sony, who has already learned their lesson in tinkering with other people's hardware and software.

912.4.2007 15:06

Remember, you are also using up some of your internet bandwidth and somewhere near 100 Watts of power(?) (2.4 kilowatt hours/day = 876 kilowatt hours/year). You are also accessing that disk drive which will cause it to wear out sooner.

Since you are not thermally shocking the PS3 by turning it on and off, component wear may be a wash, but that HD will definitely wear out sooner.

1012.4.2007 17:02

Originally posted by Allegro1:
Remember, you are also using up some of your internet bandwidth and somewhere near 100 Watts of power(?) (2.4 kilowatt hours/day = 876 kilowatt hours/year). You are also accessing that disk drive which will cause it to wear out sooner.

Since you are not thermally shocking the PS3 by turning it on and off, component wear may be a wash, but that HD will definitely wear out sooner.

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witch would cause it more trouble powering on and off allot or running most of the time.

1113.4.2007 21:50

I am a big fan of Folding@home and similar programs. I run them myself, but to do something like that for monatary purposes for a business, I find disgusting. Make deals with the other programs that are similar to Folding@home, like these here, which will help man kind, instead of making money for some company.

1213.4.2007 21:58

wetsparks
you forget folding at home is a free setup and if the cause is right sony will let them on the PS3,but its not such a bad idea to sub out the iedaling power to help manage the moeny losses the system brings all in all as long as the end user has a choice in when its run and such I don't have much a issue with it,its not like they will start making folding at home pay.

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