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DVD and Blu-ray still most popular way to get video

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 14 May 2009 1:12 User comments (33)

DVD and Blu-ray still most popular way to get video Despite all the attention garnered by technology like streaming video and internet VOD, Americans still spend more money on discs than any other type of video delivery. In this year's update to their annual Entertainment Trends In America survey, analysts at the NPD Group found 88% of money spent on home video acquisition going to DVD and Blu-ray purchases and rental.
"Discs are still and by far the dominant way Americans enjoy home video, but there is an increasing appetite for digital options," said Russ Crupnick, entertainment industry analyst for NPD. "The good news is that the consumers engaging with digital video today also tend to be heavy consumers of DVDs and Blu-ray Disc, but it remains to be seen just how long physical discs and digital formats can co-exist."

Of course spending on discs and streaming aren't mutually exclusive. If you happen to be one of the several million Netflix subscribers you get access to their Watch Instantly service for free. As a result they've managed to become the country's most successful streaming video provider.

But there are still obstacles to streaming that go beyond dollars and cents. It's not terribly unreasonable for many Americans to stream a DVD resolution movie, but HD content isn't quite so simple.

With more than two and a half times the number of pixels, the bandwidth required for streaming even 720p video isn't quite as readily available or cheap. VOD services like the one offered by Blockbuster, address that problem by letting you download before viewing.

For now it looks like the hurdles to internet-based video are big enough that you shouldn't expect discs to go away anytime soon.

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33 user comments

114.5.2009 1:35

one of the main reasons i like dvds over streaming and digital movies is because then im able to own a physical copy of it. nothing beats a physical copy.

214.5.2009 2:21

tell that to all the torrent loaders

314.5.2009 2:35

Streaming and digital copies of movies will eventually become the norm.

However, due to the lack of fiber-optic internet as well as recent events such as bandwidth caps, and DRM that would be placed on digital content, physical media will continue to be "the choice" for some time.

Yes, physical content such as DVDs and Blu-Ray discs do have DRM but it's been beaten time and time again.

If digital copies become the way to get video than I'm sure the DRM "protecting" that material will be attacked and beaten just as the DRM on DVDs and Blu-Ray discs has.

But until digital copies become a more main stream item its protections are probably safe, to a point.

Peace

414.5.2009 3:14

Originally posted by dragnandy:
one of the main reasons i like dvds over streaming and digital movies is because then im able to own a physical copy of it. nothing beats a physical copy.
My thoughts exactly. I'm a movie/TV-series/anime fanatic and nothing beats my physical media (not to mention streaming/downloading of the legal kind lacks the extra's and additional audio tracks or subtitles we have on DVD/Blu-ray). It's like a collector collecting stamps and the likes: you want your collection to be tangible.

Moreover, with current technologies, digital distributed media can't achieve the level of video and audio quality that Blu-ray (and the now defunct HD-DVD) can offer.

514.5.2009 7:02

Originally posted by Pop_Smith:
Streaming and digital copies of movies will eventually become the norm.
It will become the norm BUT FOR RENTAL ONLY.

For ownership people will still want a physical copy of the movie - on disc or on any other medium.

A download or a streamed movie has absolutely no resale value. Do you see streamed movies for sale on eBay?

614.5.2009 8:09

Originally posted by HDNow:
Originally posted by Pop_Smith:
Streaming and digital copies of movies will eventually become the norm.
It will become the norm BUT FOR RENTAL ONLY.

For ownership people will still want a physical copy of the movie - on disc or on any other medium.

A download or a streamed movie has absolutely no resale value. Do you see streamed movies for sale on eBay?
Both will coexist - physical media for ownership and streaming/downloads mainly for rental.

That's why more and more BluRay players are coming out with built-in Netflix streaming like the Samsung BD-P2500 and the LG BD300 (which adds CinemaNow and YouTube) .

714.5.2009 9:44

DVD and Blu-ray still most popular way to get video? and Blu-ray? I'm sorry but that title is misleading, the proper one should be: DVD still most popular way to get video.

DVD is still very much the in-demand format of choice, equating to 63% of all home entertainment purchases made in the US. This statistic comes from a new report released by research analysts The NPD Group, which suggests there's still life in the standard-def disc format.

Blu-ray is competing but only just, accounting for just 7% of home entertainment sales. The hi-def disc has even been trumped by VOD, which came in a 9%. It was downloads which fared the worst, however, contributing to a mere 3% of consumer spending.

Quoting the following source:

http://www.techradar.com/news/home-cinem...a-jungle-598573

814.5.2009 10:07

I also prefer dvds because you pay for them once and can watch over and over without paying anything else. Streaming requires paying constant monthly fees to watch your programs.

914.5.2009 12:12

Originally posted by ematrix:
DVD and Blu-ray still most popular way to get video? and Blu-ray? I'm sorry but that title is misleading, the proper one should be: DVD still most popular way to get video.
The article is about physical vs digital streaming. Not between the two forms of physical media. We all know that blu-ray isn't up to DVD in terms of popularity and sales.

Streaming may become the norm for rentals, but will always just be an option for the majority. It's convenient for a quick view, but it will never replace the idea of owning a physical copy of the movie you like. As the survey group points out, the vast majority of people like to own movies. We all know that. Streaming is and will always be exactly what they say - a popular option.

If you have a Netflix subscription, it's a lot easier and more convenient to stream than wait for a physical copy to come to your door (obvious), and at least you don't feel like you've wasted time and money waiting for snail-mail to deliver what may be a piece of crap movie. So if a subscriber is offered both a choice of physical and digital, it's obvious what will be chosen depending on the movie. Not sure if I'd be dying to see any Adam Sandler dribble on a blu-ray disc (don't get me wrong, I can find his stuff amusing).
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 14 May 2009 @ 12:13

1014.5.2009 12:29

Emu I think I understand your Sandler comment. I never buy dramas or comedies on DVD infact now with Hulu & Netflix I can often see that stuff for free streaming or as part of my subscription no need for high graphics clarity on the other Hand many action, horror & Sci-Fi flicks look better and actually benefit from the HD experience.

1114.5.2009 13:49

I don't know. I'm not very happy about digital format. It's convenient but for how long? Consider this. Everyone has gone through it at least once. File corruption, lost files, broken HDDs. This is just me but I really don't trust it all yet. I have VHS tapes that last longer than the digital formats I convert them to. Thanks but no thanks I'll keep my BLURAY and DVD discs a while longer ^_^

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 14 May 2009 @ 13:50

1215.5.2009 8:31

Originally posted by Pop_Smith:
Streaming and digital copies of movies will eventually become the norm.

However, due to the lack of fiber-optic internet as well as recent events such as bandwidth caps, and DRM that would be placed on digital content, physical media will continue to be "the choice" for some time.

Yes, physical content such as DVDs and Blu-Ray discs do have DRM but it's been beaten time and time again.

If digital copies become the way to get video than I'm sure the DRM "protecting" that material will be attacked and beaten just as the DRM on DVDs and Blu-Ray discs has.

But until digital copies become a more main stream item its protections are probably safe, to a point.

Peace
I don't think so even with fibre systems there are just too many people to share bandwidth for this type of transmittion and the communications companies get more and more greedy limiting your useage and charging more for it. Now a satellite system could change that but a few companies have already tried this and failed.

You can capture streaming and make a physical copy but why the quality is horrible as streaming is on your PC or TV, unless you watch it on your iPod.

1315.5.2009 15:28

Originally posted by ematrix:
DVD and Blu-ray still most popular way to get video? and Blu-ray? I'm sorry but that title is misleading, the proper one should be: DVD still most popular way to get video.
Originally posted by emugamer:
The article is about physical vs digital streaming. Not between the two forms of physical media. We all know that blu-ray isn't up to DVD in terms of popularity and sales.
This is true only in the case of DVD. The original news is about DVD still being the most popular way to get video, with 63% of home entertaiment sales, surpassing by far Blu-ray, as well as streaming video and internet VOD; the article posted here is misleading into making you believe this is also the case with Blu-ray, when in fact the statistic in the new report from NPD Group, show Blu-ray accounting for just 7% of home entertainment sales, and that has even been trumped by VOD, which came in a 9%, therefore more people preferred VOD than Blu-ray.

1415.5.2009 18:41

emugamer is right. ematrix just doesn't get it.

The article isn't talking about DVD vs BD.

It's talking about discs vs digital distribution.

...and if I remember my basic math correctly, the 88% number for discs is still the majority.

1516.5.2009 1:46

It may be a while off, but I think digital will surpass Disks eventually.

Right now, digital formats have quite a few hurdles, but they are hurdles which are being overcome.
The Bandwidth is one thing but I think that's a minor one. It might take 2 hours to get an HD movie downloaded, but that's still faster and easier in most cases than buying the disk. Streaming is one thing but an actual digital copy is another. Bandwidth is not so much of a problem that they would have you think.
It's considerably more convenient to have a digital copy than a disk copy. Sure, the disk is an actual thing which you own but there is no reason a legal copy of a movie could not be re-downloaded if it were lost somehow, which would completely negate any concerns about the tangibility (is that a word?) of the movie. Digital copies can be stored, transferred, copied, emailed, and backed up. They can ALL be available at all times (instead of having to go dig out the disk).

I think that right now the major hurdles are a lack of dummy proof players, availability of legal digital downloads (not streaming) and just plain old momentum. The Disks have the momentum right now. They are a no-brainer. Eventually, digital will become a no-brainer and then you will see disk players getting packed into the closet with those old VHS players.

I think it's going to be a grand future!

1616.5.2009 4:00

Originally posted by Toshibot:
emugamer is right. ematrix just doesn't get it.

The article isn't talking about DVD vs BD.

It's talking about discs vs digital distribution.

...and if I remember my basic math correctly, the 88% number for discs is still the majority.
With all due respect, you just don't get my point. The original press release from NPD Group was about analysing the entertainment consumption for all types of home video purchases and rentals, not exclusively about DVD/BD discs vs digital distribution like VOD and streaming, as implied in this article.

Even this article's title "DVD and Blu-ray still most popular way to get video" misleads readers into believing, that Blu-ray is an in-demand format of choice equal (or close to equal) to DVD, when in fact is nowhere near what DVD alone achieves; while this article informs only that 88% of money spent on home video acquisition going to DVD and Blu-ray purchases and rentals, it never clarifies the percentages that DVD and Blu-ray achieved.

The original press release from NPD Group, revealed that the average U.S. home video consumer reported spending an average of $25 per month on all types of home video purchases and rentals. When it comes to spending on home video content: 63% was spent on DVD purchases; 7% on BD purchases; 18% on DVD/BD rentals from retail stores, subscriptions or kiosks; 9% on video on-demand (VOD); and 3% on digital downloads and online streaming.

Therefore according to NPD Group, DVD alone is still very much the in-demand format of choice to get video (and not Blu-ray included) specially when it cames to purchasing movies, which is clearly reflected in their press release's title: "DVD Still Dominates Home Video in the U.S., but Digital Options Gain Traction"... notice that Blu-ray isn't in the title? Peace.

1716.5.2009 7:29

^^^^
LOL! He still doesn't get it.

The actual NPD report bundles up DVD AND BLURAY TOGETHER:

http://www.npd.com/press/releases/press_090512.html

Read the text under the title.

Quote:
“Entertainment Trends in America” report reveals that 88 percent of consumers’ home video spending goes toward DVD and Blu-ray Disc purchases and rental

PORT WASHINGTON, NEW YORK, May 12, 2009 – According to The NPD Group, a leader in market research for the entertainment industry, watching movies and other video content on DVD and Blu-ray Disc (BD) comprises the lion’s share of home-video acquisition and viewing, even as newer digital methods are beginning to gain a foothold in the consumer market. In fact DVD and BD sales and rentals represented 88 percent of consumer spending on home video content, based on a survey that asked about home video consumption over the previous three months.
The title of the article is still correct. It is not misleading as he claims.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 16 May 2009 @ 7:54

1816.5.2009 9:42

As much as you hear alot of people saying that Digital Distribution is the future, there'll always be more people that prefer buying physical things.

1916.5.2009 16:54

You just refuse to understand what my point is, everybody that has posted this news on their sites, read the report and didn't found enough evidence to make the claim that "Blu-ray still most popular way to get video" as DVD is, like this article does, which also never clarifies how much of that 88% of consumer spending on home video content went to DVD and Blu-ray separately, misleading people into believing that Blu-ray is as popular as DVD (which is not) and by far more popular than digital distribution like VOD and streaming (which also is not).

The actual NPD report does mention that most of consumer spending on home video content, when for DVD and Blu-ray movies versus digital distribution, but it does clarify (which this article never does) that 63% went to DVD purchases, while 7% went to Blu-ray purchases (which is 2% lower for what consumers spent for VOD); while it doesn't specify how much each one got separately, also clarifies that 18% went to DVD/BD rentals. Even if you grant a large portion of those 18% to Blu-ray rentals exclusively (which i doubt) it will still be only a few percentage points in difference from what VOD achieved.

In conclusion, DVD is still the only one preferred in-demand and popular choice to get video (everybody else that wrote about this report has made an emphasis about that) Blu-ray was probally (if you combine purchases and possible large rentals, but not for sure) a distant second place, but only for a few percentage points in difference from digital distribution like VOD achieved, and certanly not even close to what DVD achieved on its own, yet all of this is not enough to make the claim "Blu-ray still most popular way to get video" as this article's title claims, certanly the NPD doesn't neither everybody else that has written about it.

http://www.npd.com/press/releases/press_090512.html

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 16 May 2009 @ 17:03

2016.5.2009 17:00

Typical downplaying of any good news of a format he doesn't support.

http://www.npd.com/press/releases/press_090512.html

Quote:
“Entertainment Trends in America” report reveals that 88 percent of consumers’ home video spending goes toward DVD and Blu-ray Disc purchases and rental

PORT WASHINGTON, NEW YORK, May 12, 2009 – According to The NPD Group, a leader in market research for the entertainment industry, watching movies and other video content on DVD and Blu-ray Disc (BD) comprises the lion’s share of home-video acquisition and viewing, even as newer digital methods are beginning to gain a foothold in the consumer market. In fact DVD and BD sales and rentals represented 88 percent of consumer spending on home video content, based on a survey that asked about home video consumption over the previous three months.

2116.5.2009 17:26

LOL! Typical intensification of any news for a niche format he does support.

Quote:
Results from NPD’s March 2009 update to the “Entertainment Trends In America” consumer tracking study, which provides an in-depth look at shifts in entertainment consumption, revealed that the average U.S. home video consumer reported spending an average of $25 per month on all types of home video purchases and rentals. When it comes to spending on home video content: 63 percent was spent on DVD purchases; 7 percent on BD purchases; 18 percent on DVD/BD rentals from retail stores, subscriptions or kiosks; 9 percent on video on-demand (VOD); and 3 percent on digital downloads and online streaming.

2216.5.2009 17:49

Originally posted by HDNow:
Typical downplaying of any good news of a format he doesn't support.

http://www.npd.com/press/releases/press_090512.html

Quote:
“Entertainment Trends in America” report reveals that 88 percent of consumers’ home video spending goes toward DVD and Blu-ray Disc purchases and rental

PORT WASHINGTON, NEW YORK, May 12, 2009 – According to The NPD Group, a leader in market research for the entertainment industry, watching movies and other video content on DVD and Blu-ray Disc (BD) comprises the lion’s share of home-video acquisition and viewing, even as newer digital methods are beginning to gain a foothold in the consumer market. In fact DVD and BD sales and rentals represented 88 percent of consumer spending on home video content, based on a survey that asked about home video consumption over the previous three months.

Yes. Typical strategy on most boards these days.

>Downplay any good news.
>Change the subject.

It all amounts to one word: SPIN.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 16 May 2009 @ 17:50

2316.5.2009 18:17

REALLY? LOL!!! What has been your strategy for the past months/years? Intensify any news regarding your beloved niche market, misleading readers that they should jump on the blu wagon, when in fact its popularity and consumption has been pretty scarce after 3 years, yet the only way you make some kind of presence, is grabbing king DVD's arm really tight. Yes. Typical strategy on most boards these days, specially here in afterdawn. Think whatever allows you to sleep at nights, I'll stick with the numbers that show that DVD is still the only most popular way to get video.

Quote:
Results from NPD’s March 2009 update to the “Entertainment Trends In America” consumer tracking study, which provides an in-depth look at shifts in entertainment consumption, revealed that the average U.S. home video consumer reported spending an average of $25 per month on all types of home video purchases and rentals. When it comes to spending on home video content: 63 percent was spent on DVD purchases; 7 percent on BD purchases; 18 percent on DVD/BD rentals from retail stores, subscriptions or kiosks; 9 percent on video on-demand (VOD); and 3 percent on digital downloads and online streaming.
http://www.npd.com/press/releases/press_090512.html
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 16 May 2009 @ 18:21

2416.5.2009 18:25

Originally posted by ematrix:
Typical strategy on most boards these days, specially here in afterdawn.
Thanks for proving my point.

2516.5.2009 18:50

No please, thank you for proving my point. DVD is still the only one preferred in-demand and popular choice to get video, Blu-ray is NOT, when in fact has as scarce popularity and consumption as VOD and streaming, and no matter what your strategy is and has been, from picking on others that have a contrary oppinion than yours, and misleading people to jump the blu wagon, you can't change that.

2616.5.2009 18:59

Originally posted by HDNow:
Originally posted by ematrix:
Typical strategy on most boards these days, specially here in afterdawn.
Thanks for proving my point.
Successful experiment?

2716.5.2009 19:25

Quote:
I'm certainly not paying the ludicrous prices Time Warner charges for VOD services. And as much as I love my TiVO HD, Netflix streaming through it is pretty drab most of the time. It's a rare time (mostly around 5-6 a.m.) when it actually streams at full bandwidth and gives me a 16:9 picture. Most of the time it's much smaller and looks like it's been through a mis-calibrated anamorphic filter or something. The proportion is off, and resolution is worse than VHS.

No competition for a nice Blu-ray dics at all. And I doubt, with all the ISPs pushing for ludicrously small bandwidth caps (and no, TW, I don't need to be "edumicated" about it, I know exactly what you're up to - monopolistic anti-competitive behavior), or considering caps with few exceptions, discs are the future. And if the state of broadband and cellular service is any indicator, there ain't anything going to happen any time soon to change it.

It's time to set Blu-ray on stun and chew bubblegum. And I'm all out of bubblegum.

2816.5.2009 20:31

Quote:
Originally posted by HDNow:
Originally posted by ematrix:
Typical strategy on most boards these days, specially here in afterdawn.
Thanks for proving my point.
Successful experiment?
Sure, this has been successful in showing that it's easy to missquote, distort and manipulate press releases, reports, news, even personal oppinions on the matter, so someone can intensify news at its convinience, and misleading others to jump on the blu wagon, while diminishing those oppinions and facts that're contrary to its objective.

And by the way, when i said "Typical strategy on most boards these days, specially here in afterdawn" i was being sarcastic as you have the audacity to criticize, while your behaviour towards others, that have contrary oppinions than yours, hasn't been exceptional; sure it's easy to pick, bully and quote out of context, but of course that has been your "Typical strategy on most boards these days, specially here in afterdawn."

You want to get back on subject? Fine by me. You can claim that this article is about phisical discs vs digital distribution, and while the intent of the NPD report was about analysing the entertainment consumption for all types of home video purchases and rentals, indeed we see a preference for the phisical media, yet this article suggest that Blu-ray was largely responsable for that, specially with its title "DVD and Blu-ray still most popular way to get video" and by ommiting critical information that reveals that DVD is mostly responsible for that, as the only in-demand format of choice by a large margin, while Blu-ray is among VOD and streaming as the less preferred choices among consumers.

http://www.npd.com/press/releases/press_090512.html
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 16 May 2009 @ 20:37

2916.5.2009 21:43

Originally posted by Toshibot:
Originally posted by HDNow:
Originally posted by ematrix:
Typical strategy on most boards these days, specially here in afterdawn.
Thanks for proving my point.
Successful experiment?
LOL! Since he still doesn't realize it I'd say it's 100 percent successful.

3016.5.2009 22:25

The topic, article & information posted here at aD as news specifically states DVD & Blu-ray, so that is the subject of which is being discussed. Now I have to add that it's okay to talk about another similar topic but NOT derail it to become something else of which becomes way off topic...lest it becomings an argument. Understand?

I believe that is fair, but it's time to move on before disciplinary action is implemented.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 16 May 2009 @ 23:18

3116.5.2009 22:28

Originally posted by juankerr:
Quote:
I'm certainly not paying the ludicrous prices Time Warner charges for VOD services. And as much as I love my TiVO HD, Netflix streaming through it is pretty drab most of the time. It's a rare time (mostly around 5-6 a.m.) when it actually streams at full bandwidth and gives me a 16:9 picture. Most of the time it's much smaller and looks like it's been through a mis-calibrated anamorphic filter or something. The proportion is off, and resolution is worse than VHS.

No competition for a nice Blu-ray dics at all. And I doubt, with all the ISPs pushing for ludicrously small bandwidth caps (and no, TW, I don't need to be "edumicated" about it, I know exactly what you're up to - monopolistic anti-competitive behavior), or considering caps with few exceptions, discs are the future. And if the state of broadband and cellular service is any indicator, there ain't anything going to happen any time soon to change it.

It's time to set Blu-ray on stun and chew bubblegum. And I'm all out of bubblegum.

Completely agree about TWC, and Comcast isn't any better. Netflix streaming is pretty much hit or miss for me too - mostly miss as I don't really feel like I get full bandwidth even during non-peak hours. Maybe I'll try how it is at between 1am and 3am if I'm still awake.

3226.5.2009 8:16
neil852
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This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 26 May 2009 @ 8:24

3318.6.2009 5:56

Hi,

I just bought a bluRay player and I love it when I watch a bluRay on it. But there is one fact I am worried about. When I look a normal DVD on my bluRay player and the upscaling feature is enabled it looks kind of strange sometimes. Especially the background of scenes where the camera is in movement.
Any experiences related to this problem...?
Bye

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 06 Jul 2009 @ 6:57

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