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3D technology may still cause headaches, say eye experts

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 10 Jan 2010 15:48 User comments (33)

3D technology may still cause headaches, say eye experts 3D technology was the biggest new trend of the 2010 CES event, and the creation of new glasses and digital 3D has certainly made the experience a more enjoyable one. Despite the advances, prominent eye experts has said that 3D tech may still lead to headaches for many users, and they should have their eyes checked first before investing in 3D HDTVs or other tech.
"There are a lot of people walking around with very minor eye problems, for example a minor muscle imbalance, which under normal circumstances, the brain deals with naturally," says Dr Michael Rosenberg, an ophthalmology professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. 3D "translates into greater mental effort, making it easier to get a headache," Rosenberg added.

Normally, each eye will see things at a different angle.

"When that gets processed in the brain, that creates the perception of depth,"
adds Dr. Deborah Friedman, a professor of ophthalmology and neurology at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. "The illusions that you see in three dimensions in the movies is not exactly calibrated the same way that your eyes and your brain are. If your eyes are a little off to begin with, then it's really throwing a whole degree of effort that your brain now needs to exert. This disparity for some people will give them a headache."

Dr. John Hagan, a fellow with the American Academy of Ophthalmology adds that anyone with a lack of depth perception or eye muscle issues may not be able to see 3D images at all, or will have trouble processing the images.

Rick Heinemen, of 3D theater equipment provider RealD, says digital technology has solved most of 3D's former problems, notably headaches and nausea. Older 3D tech used two film projectors, one for each eye. If they weren't lined up properly, the image would cause headaches. With digital there is only one projector.

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33 user comments

110.1.2010 17:58

I don't get head aches from 3-D nor any of my family. I think this is s crock.

210.1.2010 20:53

Originally posted by Mez:
I don't get head aches from 3-D nor any of my family. I think this is s crock.
Because you represent the entire population? These people are probably in the minority but that doesn't mean it's a crock.

310.1.2010 21:10

I have minor eye muscle problems, as well as horrendous depth perception but seeing Avatar did not give me a headache, fortunately. I did have to take off the glasses a few times to refocus my eyes, but I do that without them on on a regular basis so can't be sure it was the 3D.

410.1.2010 22:52

That would explain why I've got problems watching a 3D movie....I've got depth perception issues.

510.1.2010 23:03

Huge headache every time I've tried 3D VR simulators (the ones you mount on your head, etc). I do stay away from 3D video stuff because of this.

610.1.2010 23:17

Originally posted by tatsh:
Huge headache every time I've tried 3D VR simulators (the ones you mount on your head, etc). I do stay away from 3D video stuff because of this.
if that was a while a go then i'd give it another go as they don't flicker so much now.

I went an saw avatar at the cinema. I didin't get a headache but it took me about 30 minutes to get 'used' to wearing the glasses. I didn't' find them very comfortable, and i think that's where most people will be reluctant to invest in a 3d tv.

with a 3d tv with HD that i didn't have to wear glasses, and worked at normal lounge room angles... then i'd be tempted to replace my current tv..

711.1.2010 2:25

Gives me a slight headache after a while and one eye usually hurts. Only really experienced real discomfort with avatar due to it being so long but I tended to forget about it during the good parts.

I still enjoy the 3D effect, it's something different and gives me a jolt when something appears right in your face.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 11 Jan 2010 @ 2:32

811.1.2010 2:54

i have terrible eye sight plus i had an eye injury in 1997.i wear contact lens 15 hours a day just to see properly.Ive watched a 3D movie at IMAX back in 2000 and my eyes were fine.I honestly dont know if my eyes would cope watching digital or high definition 3D but i will find out one day.


custom built gaming pc from early 2010,ps2 with 15 games all original,ps3 500gbs with 5 games all original,yamaha amp and 5.1channel surround sound speakers,46inch sony lcd smart tv.

911.1.2010 10:00

haha, if you watched an imax in 3D then you saw a High definition (maybe not digital) 3D image since imax has greater resolution than 1080p.

Avatar and 3d movies give me a headache.

1011.1.2010 10:27

Originally posted by hendrix04:
haha, if you watched an imax in 3D then you saw a High definition (maybe not digital) 3D image since imax has greater resolution than 1080p.

Avatar and 3d movies give me a headache.
I actually usually get head aches from 3D stuff but avatar surprisingly didn't bother me.

1111.1.2010 10:45
av_verbal
Inactive

we are going to be forced to upgrade to their "rob us blind by forcing upgrade" technology whether we like it or not.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2010...eady-or-not.ars

Quote:

3D TV: Why you'll (someday) own one whether you like it or not

2010 will be the first year that you can walk into Best Buy, put on some glasses, check out a few 3D TVs... and be underwhelmed by what you see. Eventually, though, you'll take the 3D plunge—we all will, because we won't have a choice.
By Jon Stokes | Last updated January 10, 2010 10:45 PM

"3D comes to your living room" was supposed to be one of the biggest stories at CES 2010, and indeed it was—the promotional push by Panasonic, LG, Samsung, Sony, and a few smaller panel makers was massive, with multimillion-dollar booth setups intended to awe conference-goers and start the technology off with a bang.

Unfortunately for the billions that have been pumped into R&D and manufacturing for 3D TVs, the normally hype-friendly press has been completely underwhelmed by what its sees after donning the ubiquitous shutter glasses here on the show floor. The collective response from the early adopter crowd at every booth has been, "Meh, I'm not going to buy one of these."

But because of the specific approach that the industry has settled on, consumers don't have to be bowled over for 3D TV to wind up in every living room. Here's a look at the current state of 3D TV, and at why it's coming to a screen near you whether you like it or not.

1211.1.2010 12:09

I guess this is the next step before projected "holo" images become a reality... tho I wonder whats more likely in the next 100 years papper thin monitors or full on hologrphic displays.

1311.1.2010 12:19

Quote:
we are going to be forced to upgrade to their "rob us blind by forcing upgrade" technology whether we like it or not.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2010...eady-or-not.ars

Quote:

3D TV: Why you'll (someday) own one whether you like it or not

2010 will be the first year that you can walk into Best Buy, put on some glasses, check out a few 3D TVs... and be underwhelmed by what you see. Eventually, though, you'll take the 3D plunge—we all will, because we won't have a choice.
By Jon Stokes | Last updated January 10, 2010 10:45 PM

"3D comes to your living room" was supposed to be one of the biggest stories at CES 2010, and indeed it was—the promotional push by Panasonic, LG, Samsung, Sony, and a few smaller panel makers was massive, with multimillion-dollar booth setups intended to awe conference-goers and start the technology off with a bang.

Unfortunately for the billions that have been pumped into R&D and manufacturing for 3D TVs, the normally hype-friendly press has been completely underwhelmed by what its sees after donning the ubiquitous shutter glasses here on the show floor. The collective response from the early adopter crowd at every booth has been, "Meh, I'm not going to buy one of these."

But because of the specific approach that the industry has settled on, consumers don't have to be bowled over for 3D TV to wind up in every living room. Here's a look at the current state of 3D TV, and at why it's coming to a screen near you whether you like it or not.

You truly are the harbinger of tech doom. Explain please. I scanned the article quickly looking for the reason why we will soon be forced to don 3D glasses. Maybe I missed something.

1411.1.2010 12:32

Quote:
Quote:
we are going to be forced to upgrade to their "rob us blind by forcing upgrade" technology whether we like it or not.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2010...eady-or-not.ars

Quote:

3D TV: Why you'll (someday) own one whether you like it or not

2010 will be the first year that you can walk into Best Buy, put on some glasses, check out a few 3D TVs... and be underwhelmed by what you see. Eventually, though, you'll take the 3D plunge—we all will, because we won't have a choice.
By Jon Stokes | Last updated January 10, 2010 10:45 PM

"3D comes to your living room" was supposed to be one of the biggest stories at CES 2010, and indeed it was—the promotional push by Panasonic, LG, Samsung, Sony, and a few smaller panel makers was massive, with multimillion-dollar booth setups intended to awe conference-goers and start the technology off with a bang.

Unfortunately for the billions that have been pumped into R&D and manufacturing for 3D TVs, the normally hype-friendly press has been completely underwhelmed by what its sees after donning the ubiquitous shutter glasses here on the show floor. The collective response from the early adopter crowd at every booth has been, "Meh, I'm not going to buy one of these."

But because of the specific approach that the industry has settled on, consumers don't have to be bowled over for 3D TV to wind up in every living room. Here's a look at the current state of 3D TV, and at why it's coming to a screen near you whether you like it or not.

You truly are the harbinger of tech doom. Explain please. I scanned the article quickly looking for the reason why we will soon be forced to don 3D glasses. Maybe I missed something.
I think his point is the industry is heading to standardize 3D on anything they can.

1511.1.2010 12:42

Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
we are going to be forced to upgrade to their "rob us blind by forcing upgrade" technology whether we like it or not.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2010...eady-or-not.ars

Quote:

3D TV: Why you'll (someday) own one whether you like it or not

2010 will be the first year that you can walk into Best Buy, put on some glasses, check out a few 3D TVs... and be underwhelmed by what you see. Eventually, though, you'll take the 3D plunge—we all will, because we won't have a choice.
By Jon Stokes | Last updated January 10, 2010 10:45 PM

"3D comes to your living room" was supposed to be one of the biggest stories at CES 2010, and indeed it was—the promotional push by Panasonic, LG, Samsung, Sony, and a few smaller panel makers was massive, with multimillion-dollar booth setups intended to awe conference-goers and start the technology off with a bang.

Unfortunately for the billions that have been pumped into R&D and manufacturing for 3D TVs, the normally hype-friendly press has been completely underwhelmed by what its sees after donning the ubiquitous shutter glasses here on the show floor. The collective response from the early adopter crowd at every booth has been, "Meh, I'm not going to buy one of these."

But because of the specific approach that the industry has settled on, consumers don't have to be bowled over for 3D TV to wind up in every living room. Here's a look at the current state of 3D TV, and at why it's coming to a screen near you whether you like it or not.

You truly are the harbinger of tech doom. Explain please. I scanned the article quickly looking for the reason why we will soon be forced to don 3D glasses. Maybe I missed something.
I think his point is the industry is heading to standardize 3D on anything they can.
So how is that bad? Nobody is going to be forced to buy a 3D television for day-to-day viewing. If anything, future TV's may be standardized as "3D capable." People who don't upgrade to a 3D capable TV will still be able to watch regular TV.

1611.1.2010 17:31

Originally posted by ZippyDSM:
I guess this is the next step before projected "holo" images become a reality... tho I wonder whats more likely in the next 100 years papper thin monitors or full on hologrphic displays.
Wonder how come this didn't make AD's news forum...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G3wWmtkN...index=33&fmt=18

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgPxA1hsa...embedded&fmt=18
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 11 Jan 2010 @ 17:37

1711.1.2010 20:21

Quote:
Originally posted by ZippyDSM:
I guess this is the next step before projected "holo" images become a reality... tho I wonder whats more likely in the next 100 years papper thin monitors or full on hologrphic displays.
Wonder how come this didn't make AD's news forum...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G3wWmtkN...index=33&fmt=18

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgPxA1hsa...&fmt=18

Because this was reveled at the CES 2009 and this article is about CES 2010?
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 11 Jan 2010 @ 20:22

1811.1.2010 21:18

I was interested to hear on a radio discussion of trends in 3-D that 3-D TV is already in Europe. A caller had seen soccer in 3-D on TV in Europe and said it was not good on small screen in his opinion. Not sure what technology he was watching. Apparently 3-D TV technology is here already.

Anyone know how successful it is.

2-D on the samller flat panel TV is OK in my opinion without 3-D for sport.

3-D great on big screen theatre for Avatar and such movies which exxagerate the effects really well.

1911.1.2010 21:23

I believe they're going this route for piracy issues. I would think it would be pretty damned impossible to CAM pirate a 3D movie, and a 3D broadcast will be technically much more difficult to reproduce.

As for the question of will we be forced? I believe we will. When all content is 3D then you are forced to have 3D to view it.

I have no desire for 3D in my home. In a theater it can be cool, but I just really don't see the draw for 3D TV's...

Hey, I could be wrong... wouldn't be the first time

2011.1.2010 22:09

I don't agree. I can't see it as eventually being the only option to watch TV. How can the industry alienate a large potion of their customer base that cannot watch 3D due to physical limitations? It's just stupid from a business point of view. They can say that digital technology has solved many problems that older tech brought about, but there is no way to know. It wouldn't be acceptable to force someone in a wheelchair to use the stairs. It's just a fundamental concept. You will always have people who can't use it.

2112.1.2010 1:13

Originally posted by emugamer:
I don't agree. I can't see it as eventually being the only option to watch TV. How can the industry alienate a large potion of their customer base that cannot watch 3D due to physical limitations? It's just stupid from a business point of view. They can say that digital technology has solved many problems that older tech brought about, but there is no way to know. It wouldn't be acceptable to force someone in a wheelchair to use the stairs. It's just a fundamental concept. You will always have people who can't use it.
3D TV is also available as 2D tv...it is not too hard to integrate a new technology when it is backward compatable. I doubt a lot of people will buy new hardware (other than the glasses) just for 3D, at least untill you can do it without glasses...

2212.1.2010 5:50

Quote:
Originally posted by emugamer:
I don't agree. I can't see it as eventually being the only option to watch TV. How can the industry alienate a large potion of their customer base that cannot watch 3D due to physical limitations? It's just stupid from a business point of view. They can say that digital technology has solved many problems that older tech brought about, but there is no way to know. It wouldn't be acceptable to force someone in a wheelchair to use the stairs. It's just a fundamental concept. You will always have people who can't use it.
3D TV is also available as 2D tv...it is not too hard to integrate a new technology when it is backward compatable. I doubt a lot of people will buy new hardware (other than the glasses) just for 3D, at least untill you can do it without glasses...
That's what I think. I don't get where people are coming from saying that we will all be forced to watch 3D tv. We may be all buying TV's that have 3D capability, but I highly doubt that 2D will be non-existent any time in the near future.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 12 Jan 2010 @ 5:51

2312.1.2010 13:11

I have a headache rite now and I have not watched any thing 3D for almost a year. ?? I would like to try the new Glasses. The old plastic ones that quickly got scratched does give me a headache. I’m interested in seeing this for myself.

2412.1.2010 17:00

the only headache i got was from how tight the glasses were on the back of my ears,but besides that, didnt feel a thing! I was too busy being amazed by avatar.

2513.1.2010 0:06

Originally posted by KF91:
the only headache i got was from how tight the glasses were on the back of my ears,but besides that, didnt feel a thing! I was too busy being amazed by avatar.
there are several type of 3d glasses. But If you guys think avatar was great in 3d you reallyt havent seen good 3D movies. Cartoon movies are way better for 3D effects.

2615.1.2010 11:38

Remember the game from Sega called Time Travelers?

Holographic game, I want that technology, only bigger.

2715.1.2010 12:19

Only children watch cartoons so 3D there is out for me. 3D just has too many issues even today they have been trying to make this work since the 50’s and it bombs every time. I doubt that using a 3D TV in simulated 2D is going to work for those with 3D issues i.e., Epileptics as they will still have the same issues to view 2D on a 3D TV as you are still watching a stereo signal just with the same image on each field. As the doctor states here that would still present a problem and if they forced everyone to buys these they most certainly would be sued by those going into seizures. The no-glasses 3D TV’s are only good if you are in the sweet spot, perfect viewing angle and distance, and having a TV or monitor that I always have to watch with glasses isn’t going to work for most people either. So I think this is just a new cycle of a very old fade at least until they truly perfect the technology.

2815.1.2010 15:38

Quote:
we are going to be forced to upgrade to their "rob us blind by forcing upgrade" technology whether we like it or not.

This sounds like the anti-colorization arguement.
If you don't like colorized B/W films, then turn the color down on your TV.
If you don't want to watch a 3D program and that's the only way it is broadcast, then only watch one frame.

Nobody is going to force you or anyone else to watch 3D.
You may have to buy a 3D tv if that's all that is available, but it turns out the increase in cost to add this feature is nearly nil. That's why they'll all have it.

2915.1.2010 18:16

Speaking of 3d Technology, has anyone seen THIS website:

[url=http://www.iz3d.com/driver][/url]

THIS is awesome!! I tried the drivers on Fallout 3, and the effect was quite intense... You DO need the red/blue 3d glasses, however, but it looked awesome. For some reason, I couldn't lock the settings down completely, but there were many times I was blown away!!

For those asking, the drivers are FREE, I think for a 30 day trial period (maybe longer for the true anaglyph images). It works with games like Bioshock, Fallout 3, Black And White 2, nearly ALL the Call Of Duty games, Devil May Cry 3 and 4, Crysis, F.E.A.R., Far Cry, Flatout 1 and 2, Grand Theft Auto 4 & San Andreas, Half Life 2, Halo, Left 4 Dead 1 and 2, and the list goes ON and ON. If you have the glasses, I HIGHLY recommend you at least try it out for 30 days...

3015.1.2010 18:21
scum101
Inactive

so we have had this crap from 60 years ago... and they only just realised why it was dumped in the first place.. wow.. thy must really get their billions per buck.


do yu really want to sit at home looking like a total twat to watch a 3d mpvie.... didn't think so...

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 15 Jan 2010 @ 18:23

3118.1.2010 8:44

This may have be well accepted in my 20s when all I did was work a nickle-n-dime job and watch tv but in my late 30s where everything is a rat race and building businesses/careers is the epitome, this would be a total waste of time as I only watch tv a couple of times a week ...

3220.1.2010 1:29

They will probably spin it as a Feature instead of a side effect...

3320.1.2010 8:39

i was watching the news the otherday and we are expected to receive tvs in march in australia with a built in 3D option but you will still need 3D glasses.


custom built gaming pc from early 2010,ps2 with 15 games all original,ps3 500gbs with 5 games all original,yamaha amp and 5.1channel surround sound speakers,46inch sony lcd smart tv.

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