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AT&T hack, Google WiFi snooping 'worrisome': FCC

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 15 Jun 2010 0:57 User comments (4)

AT&T hack, Google WiFi snooping 'worrisome': FCC A Federal Communications Commission (FCC) official has said both the case of Google's accidental WiFi snooping and the hack which exposed information of over 100,000 iPad users on an AT&T website are "worrisome in their own way." Google recently admitted to accidentally sniffing Internet traffic on unencrypted wireless networks while its Street View cars were snapping pictures in more than 30 countries.
"Whether intentional or not, collecting information sent over WiFi networks clearly infringes on consumer privacy," Joe Gurin, the FCC's chief of consumer and governmental affairs, wrong in a blog post. He went on to remind readers of the risks of using open networks.

Recently AT&T also has admitted that a group called Goatse Security was able to (rather easily) extract the e-mail addresses and cellular ID numbers of more than 114,000 iPad owners by exploiting a web application on the AT&T site. Among the affected users were celebrities and government officials, such as White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel.

"The iPad incident appears to be a classic security breach the kind that could happen, and has happened, to many companies and is exactly the kind of incident that has led the FCC to focus on cyber security," Gurin wrote.

"Our Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau is now addressing cyber security as a high priority. The FCC's mission is to ensure that broadband networks are safe and secure, and we're committed to working with all stakeholders to prevent problems like this in the future."

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4 user comments

115.6.2010 22:32
distraction7
Unverified new user

Honestly, I'm not sure why everyone is so upset about Google. The people to blame are the morons that didn't encrypt their networks. I live is a very rural area (all property plots are 2 or more acres), and the first thing I did was encrypt my wireless setup the moment I plugged it in. If people don't want to encrypt are are just to stupid to do so then as far as I'm concerned they are offering the information to anyone who wants to look at it. Idiots...

215.6.2010 22:40
oracle13
Inactive

"Whether intentional or not, collecting information sent over WiFi networks clearly infringes on consumer privacy," Joe Gurin

Sorry... Not when the people who own them don't encrypt them. If I don't close my drapes and walk around naked in front of the windows does that mean I get to complain about my privacy being infringed? OH!! Maybe I could sue everyone who looks in!!

318.6.2010 17:08

Originally posted by oracle13:
"Whether intentional or not, collecting information sent over WiFi networks clearly infringes on consumer privacy," Joe Gurin

Sorry... Not when the people who own them don't encrypt them. If I don't close my drapes and walk around naked in front of the windows does that mean I get to complain about my privacy being infringed? OH!! Maybe I could sue everyone who looks in!!
Well, you won't be able to sue. However if your neighbors report to law enforcement that they saw you, you may be arrested for being an exhibitionist. My advise, don't try it.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 18 Jun 2010 @ 17:14

427.6.2010 9:31
oracle13
Inactive

Originally posted by drhanaba:
Originally posted by oracle13:
"Whether intentional or not, collecting information sent over WiFi networks clearly infringes on consumer privacy," Joe Gurin

Sorry... Not when the people who own them don't encrypt them. If I don't close my drapes and walk around naked in front of the windows does that mean I get to complain about my privacy being infringed? OH!! Maybe I could sue everyone who looks in!!
Well, you won't be able to sue. However if your neighbors report to law enforcement that they saw you, you may be arrested for being an exhibitionist. My advise, don't try it.
LOL no worries. I'm on the list of "Things no one wants to see".

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