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Google wins copyright lawsuit over Viacom

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 23 Jun 2010 20:53 User comments (6)

Google wins copyright lawsuit over Viacom In early 2007, media giant Viacom demanded that Google take down copyrighted content from YouTube.
Afterwards, Viacom sued the site and its search giant owners for $1.2 billion USD, claiming Google facilitated the uploading the copyrighted videos through YouTube while doing little to deter it.

This week, Google has won the landmark case over the media companies, with a federal judge throwing out the lawsuit.

"Mere knowledge of prevalence of such activity in general is not enough,"
writes Judge Louis Stanton. "The provider need not monitor or seek out facts indicating such activity."

Viacom said it plans to appeal, calling the Judge's ruling "fundamentally flawed," as it does not reflect recent Supreme Court decisions.

The media giant is behind such hit channels like MTV and Comedy Central, and also owns the Paramount movie studio. A few of the shows that Viacom alleged were readily available on YouTube, in their entirety, were "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart," "South Park," and "SpongeBob SquarePants."

Google had argued they were entitled to "safe harbor" protection under the DMCA, and it appears that Judge Stanton agreed.

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6 user comments

123.6.2010 21:28

So I guess we wont be hearing about this on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart

223.6.2010 23:13

We might hear about it on south park.

324.6.2010 8:56

Wow. Digital Millennium Copyright Act had something that doesn't work in the interest of big media? This is news! who would of thought the law worked both ways.... google got out of this because they have better lawyers.. next they will be sued for the search engine finding downloads in the first place but you dont hear anyone going after bing or firefox dont you need a browser to axcess the web isnt it thier fault that you can search for things.....

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 24 Jun 2010 @ 8:57

424.6.2010 11:24

Well as things go these days ViaCom has a point here and I'm supprised at this judgement due to the fact.

QUOTE:
"Mere knowledge of prevalence of such activity in general is not enough," writes Judge Louis Stanton. "The provider need not monitor or seek out facts indicating such activity."

Viacom said it plans to appeal, calling the Judge's ruling "fundamentally flawed," as it does not reflect recent Supreme Court decisions.


I'm glad that the Judge ruled as he did as it is the correct ruling but is far from what has been going on in other courts recently where we all have to police for corporate America. I'm still suprised that Google isn't held responsible for their search content as you can find pirated materials through their engine, which is the direction of some of these law suites.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 24 Jun 2010 @ 11:27

525.6.2010 1:39

Originally posted by bam431:
So I guess we wont be hearing about this on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
I just saw it on the Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

62.7.2010 9:47

Originally posted by Mr-Movies:

I'm glad that the Judge ruled as he did as it is the correct ruling but is far from what has been going on in other courts recently where we all have to police for corporate America. I'm still suprised that Google isn't held responsible for their search content as you can find pirated materials through their engine, which is the direction of some of these law suites.
It can't be because it's spiders pick up heaps of things.

Going by what your saying having a link to a torrent trailer could get you pinged for pointing to a copyright file and thus get you hauled in court.

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