AfterDawn: Tech news

MSpot cloud streaming service now available for all

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 29 Jun 2010 12:51 User comments (7)

MSpot cloud streaming service now available for all After a quick private beta period, MSpot has opened their cloud streaming service to everyone, allowing for 2GB free and unlimited streaming of your own music libraries from the cloud.
The service works to your PC, Mac and Android-based smartphones or netbooks.

If you have over 2GB music you want to have everywhere (and most do), then you can purchase an MSpot storage plan for $3 a month (12 GB), $5 a month (22 GB), $10 a month for 52 GB or $14 per month for a massive 102 GB.

MSpot's media player works in IE, Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

If you are running an Android device with firmware 2.1 or higher, you can download an app "that can set aside local phone storage and both stream and download songs to whatever amount of space you allow it to take up on your SD card or built-in storage," says CNet.

For audiophiles, the company has shrunk the tracks to 48kbps AAC+ format, which will undoubtedly anger fans of FLAC or other HD file types but will help reduce bandwidth strain while still keeping great quality.

Previous Next

Related news

 

7 user comments

129.6.2010 14:18

48 kbps? thats disgusting!

229.6.2010 14:24

Originally posted by NHS2008:
48 kbps? thats disgusting!
AAC+ though...its been reviewed as the equivalent of about 256-320k MP3s.

329.6.2010 15:02

Hmmm not clear here but their website says you upload your music...so any bets on how long they get in trouble for hosting pirated music? Also I wonder how tough it would be to upload a bunch of stuff then just give others your pass or have it stolen sharing it out to the masses? Could get hairy....The studios will find a lot of stuff to sue over I'm sure....

429.6.2010 15:39
debber1212
Unverified new user

wrong. they won't get sued for anything. they're syncing your music to the cloud and allowing you access to it. It's similar to backup dumb dumb. A backup company can't get in trouble for backing up pirated copies of Windows, but the end user can. this is nothing more than a backup type of software that detects changes made to the selected directory structure at the file level. It passes changes made over the wire. Then Mspot has just added an audio player to the backend to play those songs. really nothing special here, and NO they will never get in trouble for hosting that music since they're not selling it to you.

529.6.2010 23:00

$14 a month for less space than a zune, at quality similar to FM radio? That is terrible. That kind of money would give you hosting for 5TB and a domain name! Host whatever you want with a password to keep everyone else out...you could even throw together a basic "web site" that works like a media player.

63.7.2010 1:02

wonder what 250 gbs cost me lol

75.3.2011 18:38

Until players become ubiquitous, all you are doing is downloading the same music over and over again to a device that can hold all the music you care about, which is probably less than the 8-16GB your mobile device can hold. Think about it. DropBox and Audio Galaxy combined.

The ones who really care about this are the audiophiles, and they got screwed.

Comments have been disabled for this article.

News archive