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Microsoft will still offer packaged software, for now

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 08 May 2013 19:50 User comments (8)

Microsoft will still offer packaged software, for now Microsoft has noted this week that it will not be following Adobe in killing off packaged software for Web-based subscriptions, at least not yet.
Earlier this week, Adobe ended packaged sales of its Creative Suite software, moving instead to its $50-per-month Creative Cloud and other subscription plans.

Microsoft Office spokesman Clint Patterson says they agree with Adobe that the future is software-as-a-service, "however, unlike Adobe, we think people's shift from packaged software to subscription services will take time." Subscriptions are preferable, says Patterson, because the apps will always remain up to date and subscribers can use the apps across multiple devices.

When asked how much time they think the transition will take, Microsoft says "within a decade" all customers will have been subscribed to the Web-based subscription services. "In the meantime, we are committed to offering choice--premier software sold as a package and powerful services sold as a subscription," Patterson added (via Cnet).

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8 user comments

19.5.2013 4:48

Software as a service isn't as popular as these companies think it is. The main reason they're pushing SaaS is for control reasons sorta like DRM. I'm not buying it.

29.5.2013 5:57

Originally posted by ivymike:
Software as a service isn't as popular as these companies think it is. The main reason they're pushing SaaS is for control reasons sorta like DRM. I'm not buying it.

I agree with you. Always-on DRM protection.

Clouds aside, I think they can kill packaged software and charge much less for a digital download of the installation media.

"You know, it seems that quotes on the internet are becoming less and less reliable." -Abraham Lincoln.

39.5.2013 7:53

Originally posted by ivymike:
Software as a service isn't as popular as these companies think it is. The main reason they're pushing SaaS is for control reasons sorta like DRM. I'm not buying it.
It's not DRM, it's pay to use or simply renting the software so you never actually get the software nor ever own or have an actually copy of what you are paying for.

The trade off is that it's pretty hard to pirate something that you never really have a copy of.

This will always be on the cards since music is now mainly done via MP3 and movies being digitally pirated and computer games PC is pretty much 100% digital now, even CDs don't have a copy of the game anymore it's just a digital install that you still need to access the net to be able to install it and then do any updates upon.

Companies are already renting software like office via MS, Google, Yahoo, and use Amazon to be able to allow these rented program to be used any where in the world.

it's just not hit the home consumer yet.

Soon everything will be streamed or rented and used via a streamed access or website only.

real world media products have been going for quite a while now.

Shame I think as I'm not into the digital thing, nothing really exists much but there are far more people who want to pay for stuff that doesn't actually exist.

49.5.2013 9:12

It seems to me that microsoft will never do too good selling cloud office to consumers...not when google offers essentially the same thing for free. Other than presentations and vb integration, ms office is pointless.



59.5.2013 11:04

Get ready for a lot of people to be using "outdated" software. All of these companies want you on the "subscription teat", gently suckling their "always-on" always "current" "updates-in-the-background-whether-you-like-it-or-not" model. Then their reasoning will be, that if you are not always online, or logged in, you won't be able do use their software at all. Eff that!!! I guess I'm buying up the latest boxed software, before it disappears off of shelves. The gaming industry's "always on" forced DRM bullshit taught these companies nothing. They'll learn when sales drop and piracy skyrockets. Then they'll be scratching their heads as to why.

This kind of model makes sense for educational institutions or large corporations, where usually even the OS is a volume license type of situation. For normal people, who save up for an ass-expensive piece of software, like Adobe CS, or whatever (even the Student&Teacher versions are not that cheap), these people will be fleeing in droves, like rats from a sinking ship.

But, this was inevitable, and it's the "future".

Can't wait for all the marketing bullshit explaining to me (as a customer) why I "need" this over boxed software with an actual CD in it.

They can keep it.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 09 May 2013 @ 11:07

SuckRaven

69.5.2013 15:08

Agree:

Originally posted by SuckRaven:
They'll learn when sales drop and piracy skyrockets. Then they'll be scratching their heads as to why.

Can't wait for all the marketing bullshit explaining: why I "need" this over boxed software with an actual CD in it....
Just like music. They are just pushing piracy to a higher label.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 09 May 2013 @ 15:09

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79.5.2013 15:59

don't want cloud, don't need cloud so don't use cloud.

810.5.2013 18:33

Talk about a major incentive for companies to offer free software. I buy very little software as I can always find something comparable for free. Security essentials, avg, adaware, OpenOffice, google docs, etc.

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