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Valve sued over Steam's 'no refund' policy

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 31 Aug 2014 11:55 User comments (8)

Valve sued over Steam's 'no refund' policy The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has sued digital gaming giant Valve for "breach of the Australian Consumer Law for businesses," over Steam's "no-refund" policy.
In the suit, the ACCC alleges that Valve made false representations to consumers, including:

"Consumers were not entitled to a refund for any games sold by Valve via Steam in any circumstances;
Valve had excluded, restricted or modified statutory guarantees and/or warranties that goods would be of acceptable quality;
Valve was not under any obligation to repair, replace or provide a refund for a game where the consumer had not contacted and attempted to resolve the problem with the computer game developer; and the statutory consumer guarantees did not apply to games sold by Valve."

The regulatory watchdog claims that since Valve does business to Australian consumers (without a physical presence of any kind), the company must still abide by the country's refund practices. Adds the ACCC, "Under Australian Consumer Law, everybody who buys a product or a service has a right to a refund if the product doesn't work. They have a right to a refund, or a repair. Those rights are enshrined in Australian Law, and our allegation is that Valve sought to remove those consumer rights which is a breach of Australian Consumer Law. The fact that they [Valve] are an offshore company doesn't affect the rights for consumers."

Valve says they are actively cooperating with the government body.

Source:
Kotaku

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8 user comments

11.9.2014 11:36

This goes for the United States too you punk bitch company!!!!!!!!!!!

And, while they're at it, sue them for 'fair use' where the consumer SHOULD BE ALLOWED to buy the physical copy of a game, install via whatever client he/she chooses (ie. Steam, Origin, etc) and then deactivate and turn around and sell later. Steam does not allow this.

I've considered a class action against them for years now.

21.9.2014 12:38

You don't own the game nor the software regardless if a game or not,instead your paying for a license,the game/software remains property of developer it always has whether on digital download or physical media


32.9.2014 0:50

Originally posted by hearme0:
This goes for the United States too you punk bitch company!!!!!!!!!!!

And, while they're at it, sue them for 'fair use' where the consumer SHOULD BE ALLOWED to buy the physical copy of a game, install via whatever client he/she chooses (ie. Steam, Origin, etc) and then deactivate and turn around and sell later. Steam does not allow this.

I've considered a class action against them for years now.
I purchased Half life 2 way back when. It was actually a multi cd install. I recently tried to reinstall the game, haven't played it in years and enjoyed it(nostalgia). I received an "expired serial key" message upon trying to install. After contacting valve, I was told I could "re-purchase" the game for a mere $9.99 through steam. Silly me, I thought I owned the game I purchased. I guess I didn't notice the expiration date in the EULA. By the way, my copy of half life 2 episode one gives the same error, but I can re-purchase according to them. I still have the box and the receipt for that game. I just kept the discs and serial key for the original.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 Sep 2014 @ 0:55

42.9.2014 12:55

"guarantees and/or warranties that goods would be of acceptable quality" *Sigh* If only this applied in the U.S. 1/3 of my games would have been returned..

52.9.2014 13:26

Originally posted by scorpNZ:
You don't own the game nor the software regardless if a game or not,instead your paying for a license,the game/software remains property of developer it always has whether on digital download or physical media
Yes.......a "license" is what we buy but that license belongs TO ME. I purchased the right to access that license, of which, I may resell that access to the license that is presently exclusive to ME and allow someone else to purchase that license.

You are an AD addict here and your seriously defending/contemplating this???? Go back to business school........take a business law class to while you're there!
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 Sep 2014 @ 13:27

62.9.2014 13:35

Originally posted by Menion:
"guarantees and/or warranties that goods would be of acceptable quality" *Sigh* If only this applied in the U.S. 1/3 of my games would have been returned..
Same
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 Sep 2014 @ 13:36

72.9.2014 22:35

Originally posted by hearme0:
Originally posted by scorpNZ:
You don't own the game nor the software regardless if a game or not,instead your paying for a license,the game/software remains property of developer it always has whether on digital download or physical media
Yes.......a "license" is what we buy but that license belongs TO ME. I purchased the right to access that license, of which, I may resell that access to the license that is presently exclusive to ME and allow someone else to purchase that license.

You are an AD addict here and your seriously defending/contemplating this???? Go back to business school........take a business law class to while you're there!
Funny that i thought one had to agree to said terms of license & it is they that set those terms i suggest you take the time to read them yes & if you don't like those terms don't buy it.as for no warranty or not getting a refund for a legitimate reason other than one didn't like the games is inexcusable

83.9.2014 15:50

How does this work for movies in Australia? Could I watch and return a DVD if unhappy with the movie? Sounds awful to the movie makers if you ask me.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 03 Sep 2014 @ 15:51

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