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Court orders ISP to identify 5,300 alleged pirates

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 16 Mar 2017 13:49 User comments (5)

Court orders ISP to identify 5,300 alleged pirates The details of Internet users alleged to have shared films including London Has Fallen, and Mechanic: Resurrection, have to be handed over by an ISP.
The decision came from Sweden's relatively new Patent and Market Court, and it obliges Telia to identify 5,300 subscribers that are alleged to have downloaded and shared blockbuster films. Those allegations come from Guardaley, which has a business model of tracking alleged pirates and being part of legal efforts to gain settlements from them.

"There is probable cause of infringement of copyright in the films in that they were made unlawfully made available to the public via file sharing networks," the Court wrote in its judgement.

"The applicants' interest in having access to the information outweighs any opposing interests, including the interest of the individual [subscribers] to remain anonymous."

Telia says that it values the privacy of its customers but it is legally obliged to comply with the court's order.

Read more at TorrentFreak

Tags: piracy Sweden
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5 user comments

116.3.2017 22:54

It depends on whether the courts allow for "speculative invoicing" concerning perceived damages.


Its a lot easier being righteous than right.

DSE VZ300-
Zilog Z80 CPU, 32KB RAM (16K+16K cartridge), video processor 6847, 2KB video RAM, 16 colours (text mode), 5.25" FDD

217.3.2017 19:14
hearme0
Inactive

Originally posted by Jemborg:
It depends on whether the courts allow for "speculative invoicing" concerning perceived damages.
And they damn well will as you should already know!


On a more positive note, neither of these movies have I d/l'ed so I'm safe.

317.3.2017 23:47

I don't understand why people continue to download garbage via torrents. There's other ways to pirate movies which I don't condone or waste my time with.


Cars, Guitars & Radiation

419.3.2017 15:34

I don't care who pirates for personal use, but if you pirate to profit - then it should be go directly to jail. If media mongrels are so obsessed with slowing piracy - make your IPs more affordable and accessible, the issue would be solved. (Example: Here's looking at you HBO and your retarded limits to programs to any country outside the US, or overpriced movie tickets and concessions).

520.3.2017 1:27

Originally posted by hearme0:
Originally posted by Jemborg:
It depends on whether the courts allow for "speculative invoicing" concerning perceived damages.
And they damn well will as you should already know!

In a landmark case in Oz, the ISPs said they would hand over details of people but, bless them, argued against speculative invoicing because it could be outrageous. The judge agreed and told the lawyers for they had to produce the invoice they would send out and that it must not include such speculation. Well... they came back and it totally did, natch! So the judge said to come back with another that charged the cost of buying the film and reasonable admin costs. They gave up then, and it all seemed to be dropped...


Its a lot easier being righteous than right.

DSE VZ300-
Zilog Z80 CPU, 32KB RAM (16K+16K cartridge), video processor 6847, 2KB video RAM, 16 colours (text mode), 5.25" FDD

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