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Rocker bashes Digital Rights Management

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 19 Sep 2005 19:33 User comments (10)

Rocker bashes Digital Rights Management Sometimes when we encounter copy protection on CDs that make it a pain in the ass to rip the CDs, we often make a major mistake by blaming the artists because their work is protected with copy protection. However, in a lot of cases, artists who are signed to major labels like Sony that use copy protection on CDs don't agree with it and often become angered about it. Tim Foreman of Switchfoot has become the latest artist to speak out against Digital Rights Management Technology at a music forum.
He expressed his anger at DRM after the band received numerous complaints from fans that they could not import the music to programs like iTunes. "My heart is heavy with this whole copy-protection thing." Foreman said. "We were horrified when we first heard about the new copy-protection policy that is being implemented by most major labels, including Sony (our own label), and immediately looked into all our options for removing this from our new album." he added.

"Unfortunately, this is the new policy for all new major releases from these record companies. It is heartbreaking to see our blood, sweat and tears over the past two years blurred by the confusion and frustration surrounding this new technology." He also expressed his feelings about criticism being misdirected to artists over copy protection. "It is also unfortunate when bands such as ourselves, Foo Fighters, Coldplay, etc. are the target of this criticism, when there is no possible way to avoid this new industry policy." he said.

Instead of just speaking out about the copy protection, he also went one step further and detailed how a fan could work around the DRM to import the music to their favourite players. This is obviously something that won't be greeted by major record labels; the last thing any of the big four labels want is for their artists to firstly bash their copy protection policies and then actually give details to their fans, whom they have influence over, of how to get around them.

"We refuse to allow corporate policy to taint the family we've developed together." Foreman said in his defense. "We deeply regret that there exists the need for any of our listeners to spend more than 30 seconds importing our music, but we're asking as friends and partners in this journey together to spend the extra 10 minutes that it takes to import these songs." It is important that artists do come forward and make their feelings about copy protection known, whether they are for it or against it.

Since a significant number of artists probably don't agree with copy protection on their work that actually causes problems for their fans, it would be interesting to know how the industry would deal with such artists, considering that the music industry's major record labels wouldn't be too shy about legally threatening a website that gives details on how to bypass DRM protection -- what about their signed artists?

Source:
VnuNet.com

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10 user comments

119.9.2005 21:43

This is what im talking about, this type of thing is productive. having an artist, stand up and say "hey" thats how "battles" are won and lost. on a side note..SWITCHFOOT?? what, was there like 4 requests for his tracks?

219.9.2005 23:10

i also read where Dave Matthews Band also points out steps on how to bypass the DRM on their album.... it's great to see that artists out there actually disagree with what's being done and taking a stand against it. this brings up a few questions.. - will the industry sue the artists? (posting on a website how to bypass DRM which is deemed "illegal") ... - if i post the same thing will the industry sue me? (probably) - the industry's witnessing something they prlly didnt expect from their artists.. how will they react? (they had it coming) the right we long for... importing music from cd's to portable music players will be the argument that will help us win this battle victoriously... thank god for the popularity of the IPOD.. even though i dont have one, and dont plan on even buying one. more artists do this and the awareness of this issue will spread more than we think it will... let's just hope this continues. the industry's making itself look even worse now... serves em right. support these artists.. dont support artists who support the industry.. enough said ;)

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 19 Sep 2005 @ 23:18

320.9.2005 11:12

Quote:
Instead of just speaking out about the copy protection, he also went one step further and detailed how a fan could work around the DRM to import the music to their favourite players. This is obviously something that won't be greeted by major record labels; the last thing any of the big four labels want is for their artists to firstly bash their copy protection policies and then actually give details to their fans, whom they have influence over, of how to get around them.
I would have to agree with that. It is great to see that a band is takin the iniatatibe to give freedom of movements to fans that have already purchased a copy of the music and want to make it portable... As I have said before i also purchase good music from time to time and sometimes because i perform i like to make remixes so that when i do perform the audience feels like there at a concert whatchin and listening to all there favourite tracks.And have copy protected stuff just make it harder to deal with but not impossible... All it takes is an disgruntled person or a person that is just sick and tired of all the crap and they create something like DVD Decrypter to beat DVD protection, but for CD's, its only a matter of time e.g. CloneCD Well thats my ranting for today :)

420.9.2005 12:30

This is a very good development. :)

520.9.2005 16:07

Quote:
on a side note..SWITCHFOOT?? what, was there like 4 requests for his tracks?
Where have you been for the last couple of years ;-)? Switchfoot has been one of the hottest bands on radio and tv. BTW, they are a band, not just a him.

627.9.2005 22:52

The copyright industry are self delusional - if you can play something you can copy it; the only way to make a copy proof CD or DVD is to make it unplayable in the first place. BTW, here in France there is a legal right to be able to make copies for personal use - there was an article on here somewhere recently about Canal+ being ordered to withdraw copy protected DVDs from sale. I reckon that CDs could be next. Meanwhile I continue to put Sony CDs through a high quality DA/AD converter onto a CDR and then rip them. I get a copy for the car CD player and get to play the tracks on my MP3 portable.

71.10.2005 22:19

in America they have laws for that too...we have the right to make copies of DVD's and CD's, but only if it is for our own "personal use"

82.10.2005 0:38

And only if we don't circumvent copy-protection in the process. (I know, what's the point?)

95.10.2005 18:57
f00dl3
Inactive

Odd. I don't see anything at all even mentioning DRM on their website, none the less giving fans ideas on how to bypass it. I suggest you check your sources before you post B.S.

106.10.2005 7:36

it wasnt bs.. i saw it myself; there's another article on here explaining how the step by step guide just "disappeared"

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