AfterDawn: Tech news

RIAA stepped up fight against college students

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 21 Feb 2007 16:32 User comments (27)

RIAA stepped up fight against college students The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), a trade group that represents music companies including the "big four" record companies, has increased the amount of complaints it makes against University students across the U.S. The RIAA has been sending thousands more complaints to Universities than it did last year. The complaints are against students who share files from campus computer networks.
"It's something we feel we have to do," RIAA President Cary Sherman said. "We have to let people know that if they engage in this activity, they are not anonymous." The RIAA gave a top 25 list of the worst offending Universities to the Associated Press, claiming to have sent over 15,000 complaints to these locations in all.

The top five schools are Ohio, Purdue, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Tennessee and the University of South Carolina. Some Universities choose to punish students who receive complaints, with penalties ranging from simple email warnings to being suspended from classes for an entire semester. "They're trying to make a statement," said Randall Hall, from Michigan State University, 7th on the list with 753 complaints.

For students caught twice by the RIAA, Hall meets with them personally and forces them to watch an RIAA-produced 8 minute long, anti-piracy DVD. A third time offender is looking at suspension. "I get the whole spectrum of excuses," Hall said. "The most common answer I get is, 'All my friends are doing this. Why did I get caught?'"

Most Universities play along because they can be sued under federal law if they don't do something to stop the offenses. Others however, are not to keen to act as security guards for music copyrights. Purdue has received 1,068 complaints so far this year, quite a leap from the 37 in 2006. However, despite such a high amount of complaints, the University rarely even notifies a student about a complaint because it is too much trouble to track down alleged offenders.

"In a sense, the (complaint) letter is asking us to pursue an investigation and as the service provider we don't see that as our role," spokesman Steve Tally said. "We are a leading technology school with thousands and thousands of curious and talented technology students." Getting complaints sent to you is one thing, but the RIAA has targeted students who share a lot of music with civil lawsuits.

Source:
CNN

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27 user comments

121.2.2007 17:12

I bet that so-called "anti piracy dvd" offenders have to watch is copied over and over again by the RIAA. But thats ok, because they can make a backup but us consumers must fall on our knees and beg for mercy to the DVD God for hopes that one day too, we will be able to do the same, all without being accused of stealing.

221.2.2007 17:21

Thank God for Ruckus. It is the answer to everything.

321.2.2007 18:30
tabletpc
Inactive

this is funny because most students can mask there ip addresses and worse students usaully share between computers not online file sharing or bittorrent because most campus networks if they are smart enough notice how i said smart enough block the ports so peer to peer clients and eve bittorrents do not work but this is of course up to the university to implement a good firewall system which most campus's get taking for advantage on

422.2.2007 2:19

Sorry but the media mafia needs to be disbanded they steal more money from the artists than all the pirates of the world put together....

522.2.2007 3:34
hughjars
Inactive

Way to go guys, pick on the little guys.

Way to win public support, not.

622.2.2007 5:31

all those hard drive network file sharers have to do is put those educational disclaimers on an opening page when you acces the server just like the IRC channels. pretty sure the educational defence is air tight, it alows for the ignoring of copywrites as long as the media is only shown once. all the disclaimer has to say is "you agree that you are downloading this material for educational purposes, you agree that you will only watch this material once, make no copies, and deleet it immediantly after you view or listen to it"

722.2.2007 6:43

It seems that Perdue gets it but its worth watching because if they start going after their own it will effect the population of their campus...sad point is that those who end up paying will be the parents ......

822.2.2007 6:46

Originally posted by mystic:
It seems that Perdue gets it but its worth watching because if they start going after their own it will effect the population of their campus...sad point is that those who end up paying will be the parents ......
just think soon they might start railing on protesters and thos that think differently than the horde 0-o

922.2.2007 8:38

Why attack kids in schools pick on someone your own size.

Quote:
Thank God for Ruckus. It is the answer to everything.

What is that??

1022.2.2007 11:20

ruckus is a free online muisc source for college kids. doesnt hold a shit against gnutella 2 though, hehe.

when i was at drew they firewalled all the most popular types of p2p connections and also throttled everything else. they didnt give a crap about being sued, they just didnt want to fork over the extra chedda for more bandwidth. its hard for small private schools to negotiate reasonable IP deals, especialy in corrupt-as-fuck New Jersey. didnt stop me one bit though, all anyone has to do to beat a school firewall is learn how to "tunnel out". i didnt even have to tunnel out, i just leached off lesser known networks that hadent caught the atention of our schools bandwidth watchers. the best was IRC, if you choose "random server" in mircs options it will keep trying diferent servers and diferent types of conections untill it works automaticly. everyone else was stuck trying to get blubster to work or waiting 5 hours for a youtube video to load wile i was downloading 5 feture movies at a time at 40KBps each.

1122.2.2007 12:21
webe123
Inactive

Frankly,I would try to get my own place if I was going to college. That way I could get my own broadband and would not have to put up with the BS restrictions that colleges and universities have on their networks.

1222.2.2007 13:33

I don't download music, or movies. What they charge for their products is way too high. When they knock it down to retail, I might buy.

1322.2.2007 14:40

Quote:
I bet that so-called "anti piracy dvd" offenders have to watch is copied over and over again by the RIAA. But thats ok, because they can make a backup but us consumers must fall on our knees and beg for mercy to the DVD God for hopes that one day too, we will be able to do the same, all without being accused of stealing.
Well... you have the same rights too. If you make your own Pro-Piracy DVD with your video camera, you can make as many copies as you want.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 22 Feb 2007 @ 15:08

1422.2.2007 14:57

Quote:
all those hard drive network file sharers have to do is put those educational disclaimers on an opening page when you acces the server just like the IRC channels. pretty sure the educational defence is air tight, it alows for the ignoring of copywrites as long as the media is only shown once. all the disclaimer has to say is "you agree that you are downloading this material for educational purposes, you agree that you will only watch this material once, make no copies, and deleet it immediantly after you view or listen to it"
That will never work. You won't get the RIAA or a judge to let you off the hook because you had a disclaimer. (With a jury, you might get lucky.) You would need to show some evidence that it was truly for educational purposes.

There are limits to the educational fair-use exception. A teacher/instructor can make copies of a newspaper article for the entire class, but if they tried to make 30 copies of the textbook that would be a copyright violation.

Even when a professor has written his own book, he can't (usually) make copies of it!!! He has usually sold the copyright to a book publisher. (For the same reason, musicains are usually not allowed to give-away or sell copies of their own CDs.)
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 22 Feb 2007 @ 15:03

1522.2.2007 17:08

Yeah they've even notified some here at LSU, though not many. They are all at the bars, drunk and listening to the jukeboxes. We're rednecks, rednecks. LMAO

1622.2.2007 18:16

Well, you do have to give the RIAA some props. I mean last month they were going after minor children. At least they've graduated to college kids.

Good job RIAA, leaving the thumb sucking children alone took a lot of guts. And hey, if you get bored with the college kids, I hear the VA hospital is full of disabled pirates.

You scumsucking piece of filth. I hope you all die of cancer!

1722.2.2007 18:18

seems like the RIAA are carrying out Denial of Service attacks via snail mail.
They are attacking the uni's, the courts, isp's etc.
In fact one could say that it is more than just a DOS attack. In fact the RIAA are carrying out acts of terrorism against the US infrastructure bogging everything down, tying up all sorts of services including local police, the FBI etc, manpower, and a multitude of other resources.
Not to mention the paramilitary methods used as well.

I wonder if there is a case or cases?

1822.2.2007 19:19

I say we rally nationwide and have mass sit-ins at theaters across the land. Once your in your seat, don't leave. They can't sell tickets to seats they don't have. If we all band together and stay seated for hours,days,weeks,months or dare I say longer we will win this battle. Now I say lets go men, all together, get ready, set,
GOOOOO!!!

1922.2.2007 19:32

i wonder what sort of condition your bladder, bowels and the seat you are sitting in would be in?

2022.2.2007 19:56

That's all part of the strategy, create as much stink and do-do as possible,they have to clean it up, not us. Now let's take that first step, onward men, onward I say.

2122.2.2007 21:10

so don't you rock me DADEO1

you support the notion of crapping on the RIAA? This has quite a green and organic way about it. Do you also supply a small packet of seeds, radish perhaps?

i would tend to think triffids may be of more use.

2223.2.2007 3:27

stop buying the crap these companies are peddling, stop plopping down $10 for a movie ticket, $15 for c.d.s, you give these companies there power, your paying thier legal fees. your money goes toward lobbying polititions who support this insanity. what would you be missing? has anyone truly felt they have gotten thier monies worth with the movies that get hyped on tv? just to find out they showed the best parts in the trailer. how about that new cd you bought because you like one or two songs you heard on the radio and the rest of the disc is junk. buy your media (thats worth buying) through second hand outlets and bring these money grubbing corporations to there knees and get up off of yours!

2323.2.2007 3:30

sorry for the spelling

2423.2.2007 9:58

These kids need to check out digitalfreedom.org for info on piracy vs. fair use.

2523.2.2007 10:17

Well, the colleges can attempt to police their networks all they want. That won't help them cuz there is the sneaker net and the sneaky flash drive in the pocket.

A hypethetical student can carry a big ol' 100 gig flash drive off campus and download a heap of songs/movies. The copyright police can't grope pockets. He/She returns to the campus, and loads the contents of his naughty flash drive into his PC, and his/her friends pop by with flash drives, CD's, DVD's, whatever, and media makes the rounds.

The illicit mp3 is as stopable as a virus.

2623.2.2007 11:19

Quote:
That will never work. You won't get the RIAA or a judge to let you off the hook because you had a disclaimer. (With a jury, you might get lucky.) You would need to show some evidence that it was truly for educational purposes.
if the server was located within the campuses hard drive network, and the only people accessing it were students, and only from inside the campus network, im sure it could hold some water in court. maybe not if it had movies that hadent even come out yet, but everything else it just might work. my familiarity with educational use laws is sparce, but unless the laws are very specific in what types of physical media can be used and how it can be distributed in an academic setting (example: "may only be handend in person from the teacher to the student in class on original dvd") then it would have a good shot.

2725.2.2007 7:32

This just get's so boring... time after time.. Same old story. Just a different victim is all. Does it ever end? I don't know about you guys but I do both.. I download and I purchase. I have to download so I know what's out there.. and if it's actually in that .01% range of "not sucking" then I buy as much of it as I can from that particular artist. Take that away from me.. and well.. I just quit buying music all together. I say "no wonder your sales are dropping"
Think about it this way:
If I ran a store and I decided to prosecute everyone who picked up an item off the shelf to look at it. Do you think my store would do good business? Would you want to shop there?

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 25 Feb 2007 @ 7:35

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