AfterDawn: Tech news

Movie industry faces tough battle to protect hi-def movies

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 09 May 2007 11:53 User comments (20)

Movie industry faces tough battle to protect hi-def movies Major movie studios are already facing a tough uphill battle against attacks on copy protected retail HD DVD and Blu-Ray Disc releases. Hackers have found keys and posted them on web forums, which spread to huge user-driven sites like Digg.com and then exploded across the web. The keys could be used with the proper software to decrypt AACS content protection and extract unencrypted content from HD discs.
Of course, the Advanced Access Content System Licensing Authority (AACS LA) tried to battle the spread of a 32-bit hexadecimal key and in doing so, motivated frustrated web users enough to spread it to thousands more web pages and use it for music lyrics and t-shirt designs - obviously the opposite effect the group intended to have by invoking the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) against several web services and search engines.

"It's sort of a violation without a satisfying remedy from the standpoint of the companies and the consortium ... because how are they going to sue every blogger and everyone who has access to the code?" said Richard Neff, an intellectual property attorney at Greenberg Glusker in Los Angeles. Michael Ayers, chairman of the AACS group, said that newer movie titles cannot be decrypted using the key.

However, the reason so many users were motivated to spread this key so wildly is because it's a string of text and it is useless on its own, the motivation was not to spread a "decryption tool" - you don't see thousands and thousands of websites rushing to host DVD Decrypter if its illegal to do so in their territory. The idea that "protecting intellectual property" can be used in an attempt to banish a short string of "text" from the Internet is what startled most bloggers.

A possible 2000 legal precedent for AACS LA is a case against an online magazine that published software to decrypt DVD-Video titles. However, EFF senior attorney Fred von Lohmann isn't so sure that this particular case can fall under the 2000 legal precedent.

"It is difficult to say how a court would rule on this question, but it does create a specter of monetary liability for hosting providers, even if they otherwise comply with the 'notice-and-takedown' procedures required by the DMCA safe harbors," von Lohmann said. Constitutional law professor David Kairys of Temple University School of Law said that the AACS group could put itself in a worse position by pursuing users that are not damaging them.

"The big companies are really utilizing legal tactics that I think are questionable, the whole intent might be to shut people up rather than to assert a viable legal claim," he said. "The industry might have more to lose than to gain. Maybe they'll take a lesson from that (and) seek solutions rather than bullying people who are kind of having fun with a number."

Source:
Reuters

Previous Next  

20 user comments

19.5.2007 13:20

wow....can't wait to see what happens when the next hex line is exposed =p

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 09 May 2007 @ 13:20

29.5.2007 16:50

The number is going to be pointless without the software u run it through. They had to have realised that it was going to be broken sooner or later. Don't cry over spilt milk :)

39.5.2007 21:06
duckNrun
Inactive

I honestly think that these guys may actually believe the hype and lies that they tell the studios about how THEIR product is unbreakable. I mean how many of these suits are actually computer savvy, let alone even a mild hack, so as to realize that what they are saying is complete rubbish.

To them it may seem that their BEST bet would be to have EACH disc encrypted with it's own key so that without the RIGHT key for the RIGHT disc you get nothing. Sure it would still be worked around but the logistics may slow the process down. If they wanted to kick it up a notch they could have some verification model at the point of purchase so that IF that discs code get spread around, useless perhaps, but then that person can be charged with the appropriate charges...

In reality their best bet would be to trust their customers and allow them to access the content that they have purchased on whichever device they choose and to control the private viewing experience as the consumer sees fit.... as well as maybe dropping the price down to a more reasonable rate... perhaps by getting rid of the overhead of bogus DRM schemes and the lawyers to attack those who exert their fair use rights. That should knock off a good 50% of the wholesale cost LOL

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 09 May 2007 @ 21:06

410.5.2007 3:15

hey duckNrun about your last paragraph.........
ahahahahhahahahhahahahahahahhahahahhahahahhahahahh........
ahhahahahhahahhahahahhahahhawoowowoowowoowowowowoahahhahahahhah...
ok ok ok ok sorry about that I needed a good laugh.

Back to reality now I could talk a good enough game to these execs. I'd promise the moon and stars and tell'em pirates are the cause when i couldn't deliver.....oops wait that's already been done hasn't it?!

ahahahahhahahahahahahahahahahhahahahahha......aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

510.5.2007 3:51
duckNrun
Inactive

;-)

610.5.2007 10:46

they have lost game over.

least until they build players with RFID tech and force the media to to not work on anyhtign else they already have this tech ready to prevent shoplifting the dye or plastic of the DVD clears after the chip is scanned at the registry.

710.5.2007 13:46

Originally posted by duckNrun:
I honestly think that these guys may actually believe the hype and lies that they tell the studios about how THEIR product is unbreakable. I mean how many of these suits are actually computer savvy, let alone even a mild hack, so as to realize that what they are saying is complete rubbish.

To them it may seem that their BEST bet would be to have EACH disc encrypted with it's own key so that without the RIGHT key for the RIGHT disc you get nothing. Sure it would still be worked around but the logistics may slow the process down. If they wanted to kick it up a notch they could have some verification model at the point of purchase so that IF that discs code get spread around, useless perhaps, but then that person can be charged with the appropriate charges...


The problem with that cookie is that the cracker program will have a randomizer...that will keep picking numbers until the disk is cracked. More time consuming, then publish that disk's number on a dark net or release group...whoops!

810.5.2007 13:50

Originally posted by ZIppyDSM:
they have lost game over.

least until they build players with RFID tech and force the media to to not work on anyhtign else they already have this tech ready to prevent shoplifting the dye or plastic of the DVD clears after the chip is scanned at the registry.
The problem with that is a computer's DVD recorder/player has to read the disk in order to play the media. A hacker/cracker can bamboozle the read function somehow.

910.5.2007 14:01

Quote:
Originally posted by ZIppyDSM:
they have lost game over.

least until they build players with RFID tech and force the media to to not work on anyhtign else they already have this tech ready to prevent shoplifting the dye or plastic of the DVD clears after the chip is scanned at the registry.
The problem with that is a computer's DVD recorder/player has to read the disk in order to play the media. A hacker/cracker can bamboozle the read function somehow.

----------------------------------------------------------------
their thought process is if they cripple both the player and media that it will "sale" more.

whatever they make will always be cracked.

1011.5.2007 15:45
hughjars
Inactive

I'd just love to be in there when the pitch is made for this cr@p.

I mean, not once has any of this protection BS ever remained uncracked or unavoided.

.....and they don't get it for free, so, is it just a gravy train too many are on to give up?
Or is it like the banks and the fraud they just deny & ignore and pretend only happens to somebody else (whilst blaming the victims)?

The fundamental flaw here is that some folks just can't help themselves it seems, they just love to clutch their 'view' that the uncontrollable can be controlled.
I guess admitting the truth (that once digital info is out there it is beyond those out-dated notions of control) is just a step too far.

Hence this on-going totally pointless but nevertheless vastly expensive farce.

You'd have thought the shareholders would be starting to wake up by now tho at the waste.

1111.5.2007 15:54

hughjars
when will they learn any cheap simple protection will keep common man from coping the disc while non common man will wait till its cracked.....

1211.5.2007 19:48
duckNrun
Inactive

@ craftyzan:

Quote:
The problem with that cookie is that the cracker program will have a randomizer...that will keep picking numbers until the disk is cracked. More time consuming, then publish that disk's number on a dark net or release group...whoops!
hey! Who you calling cookie? pmsl

And actually I meant EACH individual disc for sale. But your point is still valid, just like the cracker programs for s/w that currently requires you to type in an individulaized PID# something would eventually surface that could figure out the generalized algorithm of the key encoder.

The fact is that there are no perfect methods for protecting anything. And that goes for whether it's software, media, or even airport security. If someone wants to crack the code or find the weak spot in a security system, given enough time and resources they will.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 11 May 2007 @ 19:49

1312.5.2007 10:00
Ballpyhon
Inactive

As i have stated many times before, there is not a protection that cannot be circumvented in some form or another. DVDs were cracked, Computer software cracked, Xbox Xbox360 PS2 Playstation Nintendo and alot of others cracked, HD DVDs and Blueray cracked, the list goes on. I am sure there is a lot more that i have forgotten to mention, but the fact remains that these companies and antipiracy organizations will never win. they will continue to spend millions and billions of dollars to "prevent" piracy. it just requires mod chips and such to do it now. there is more of us then there is of them. STRENGTH IN NUMBERS!

1412.5.2007 10:16
duckNrun
Inactive

I think that you will find that the general public at large shies away from cracking the case on their electronics and going through the process required to install mod chips. While they may feel comfortable ripping an iso off a rental or downloading a file instead of paying for it when it comes to maybe breaking their machine they tend to be a little more willing to buy the original.

Of course there are plenty of people who are comfortable with this procedure, and others less knowledgable who are willing to take the risk , as well as many more who have done so who can be the shepherd to those little lambs who otherwise would feel too insecure doing it themselves.

But the end result is as has been stated by everyone here:

Build a better mousetrap and a better mouse will soon appear.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 12 May 2007 @ 10:18

1512.5.2007 16:08
plusxp1
Inactive

why doesn't sum1 decompile a app like DVD Shrink and add/change the key in the app that it uses to decrypt movies, to a a HD DVD/ blu ray key and modify the code so it also has the option to decrypt HD DVD/blu ray movies...

only an idea...

could work though.......................................................

1612.5.2007 17:13
duckNrun
Inactive

I think that Shrink is now Nero Recode and so somebody might find that they get into a bit of trouble from not only the MPAA but also Nero....

???

1712.5.2007 22:05
Ballpyhon
Inactive

Originally posted by duckNrun:

Build a better mousetrap and a better mouse will soon appear.
Exactly. I could not have said it better.

There's no right, there's no wrong, there is only popular opinion.

1813.5.2007 2:24

No code is unbreakable, remember the enigma code in WW2.
They should just give up, in the end they are just wasting more money on making breakable copy protection systems.

I hope who ever created or made aacs dies a painfull death

1913.5.2007 6:29

They could just use Imitation disc after about one play they would crap out

2013.5.2007 11:03

If you are interested in having your own set of numbers protected by DMCA, then you can claim them at:

http://www.freedom-to-tinker.com/?p=1155


Here are my numbers:

F1 14 CF 86 EF F1 DD AD A4 62 A3 42 8C 38 0B 56 2007 DCM, Inc. ltd
4A 59 6B 82 8E F4 81 F1 62 19 05 FD 30 B5 88 E6 2007 DCM, Inc. ltd
Copying and redistributing these numbers without permission of
the copyright owner is strictly prohibited.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 13 May 2007 @ 11:04

Comments have been disabled for this article.

News archive