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Phillips Content Identification wants to revolutionize anti-piracy measures

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 15 Sep 2007 12:42 User comments (4)

Phillips Content Identification wants to revolutionize anti-piracy measures Hoping to revolutionize anti-piracy efforts for online video, Philips Content Identification is working on building the world's largest video fingerprinting database.
"The system in use at the moment from other technology suppliers are all re-active, whereas ours is pro-active” says Philips CEO Alex Terpstra. The systems he refers to are already in place or planned for viral video sites. They rely on reports from outside, such as DMCA takedown notices, to identify pirated video, after which can then be rejected whenever someone attempts to post it again.

According to Terpstra, the goal is to be able to identify virtually any clip of professionally produced video from just a five second sample.

Philips also announced that their technology will be powering Dolby Labs' new digital cinema watermarking technology.

"We are already dominant in digital cinema watermarking," said Terpstra, "with Christie, Dolby and XDC using our system. Thomson has its own technology, but ours is already in 3,000 digital cinemas and anyway Thomson’s Technicolor uses our technology in its special "Screener" copies of DVDs that go out to Film Academy members voting on the Oscar nominations."

Source: The Register

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4 user comments

115.9.2007 17:58
webe123
Inactive

I still do not think this will work. There is always a way around it.

216.9.2007 0:37
duckNrun
Inactive

a five second sample may identify copyrighted material but it cannot recognize fair use of that material. If it simply says 'this was previously posted and taken down so it can't be posted again' when someone only uses a few seconds or so of a clip in a fair use format then it will also be rejected.

Score: one for the rich suits who are going to hell, zero for general public

316.9.2007 4:15

The entertainment corporations must be creaming their pants at the thought of this working :P

418.9.2007 4:16

The ability to break the protection is always going to be there.

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