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Parliament considers changes to U.K. copyright law

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 09 Jan 2008 0:23 User comments (8)

Parliament considers changes to U.K. copyright law Members of the U.K. Parliament spent much of today discussing a document outlining some changes to copyright law. While many of the items discussed involved codifying existing caselaw into written law, perhaps the most interesting issue discussed was that of consumers making copies of legally purchased media, such as CDs.
Today's consultation, which included the presentation of a paper by Parliamentary Undersecretary for Intellectual Property And Quality Lord Triesman, was foreshadowed a few months ago when Parliament took up the issue of copyright term extensions. At that time there were already discussions regarding the changes discussed on Tuesday.

The copying issue, called format shifting in reference to the common practice of encoding CD audio to MP3 format, is one of the most hotly debated topics in the music industry right now. While consumers feel it should be there right to make as many copies of (legally purchased) music as they want, representatives of the recording industry are less enthusiastic about the idea.

Geoff Taylor, CEO of the U.K. equivalent of the RIAA - the BPI, noted the industry's dissapointment that the government is considering additional consumer rights with no additional compensation for copyright holders. Lord Triesman doesn't agree. In his presentation today he specifically mentioned that it doesn't make sense to pay multiple times for the same content simply to listen to it in a different setting.

The issue of DRM was also discussed, with the Lord Triesman's paper recommending that current prohibition on bypassing copy protection measures remain in place. There will be some time to think about this before the legislation is subject to another consultation before being voted on, which is expected to be some time in 2009. Among the issues to be decided are whether the proposed rights would apply only to music and movies, or whether it should be applied to other products like books.

Source: The Register

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8 user comments

19.1.2008 3:40

Fair use trumps "compensation for copyright holders" you want real compensation ? Start forcing the media conglomerates to take care of and share more money with artist's and creators of content!!!!!

29.1.2008 4:59
nobrainer
Inactive

Quote:
While consumers feel it should be there right to make as many copies of (legally purchased) music as they want, representatives of the recording industry are less enthusiastic about the idea.

Geoff Taylor, CEO of the U.K. equivalent of the RIAA - the BPI, noted the industry's dissapointment that the government is considering additional consumer rights with no additional compensation for copyright holders. Lord Triesman doesn't agree.

Ok so you can move the media YOU own to your mp3 player but the BPI (Sony, Warner, Universal & EMI basically the RIAA a$$holes) are not happy with the measure being drawn up by our government to protect us from BIG MEDIA screwing us all over and dictating through DRM what we can actually do with OUR property, and that's the thing, it is still illegal in the UK to circumvent(bypass) any form of DRM so you see what is going to happen, this is a pathetic pointless law that will protect none of our rights as all that will happen is more SONY DRM XCP ROOTKITS WITH THEIR SECRET PHONE HOME ABILITY, then its ahoy me'hearties all over again as ppl don't want restrictions placed on property they own so the pirate bay increases its userbase!

Why are they not happy, the answer is simple, the RIAA (BPI) and MPAA what to make it so you have 1 licence per device then that device will require 1 licence per user so they can generate huge revenues from this anti consumer tactic, sony with the PSN release of warhawk has already started down this road and now it looks like the MPAA has won its format of choice for Next-Gen movie players (Blu)Drm-Ray things can only get worse in regards to what you are allowed to do with property WE own!
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 09 Jan 2008 @ 5:03

39.1.2008 5:16

Quote:
Quote:
While consumers feel it should be there right to make as many copies of (legally purchased) music as they want, representatives of the recording industry are less enthusiastic about the idea.

Geoff Taylor, CEO of the U.K. equivalent of the RIAA - the BPI, noted the industry's dissapointment that the government is considering additional consumer rights with no additional compensation for copyright holders. Lord Triesman doesn't agree.

Ok so you can move the media YOU own to your mp3 player but the BPI (Sony, Warner, Universal & EMI basically the RIAA a$$holes) are not happy with the measure being drawn up by our government to protect us from BIG MEDIA screwing us all over and dictating through DRM what we can actually do with OUR property, and that's the thing, it is still illegal in the UK to circumvent(bypass) any form of DRM so you see what is going to happen, this is a pathetic pointless law that will protect none of our rights as all that will happen is more SONY DRM XCP ROOTKITS WITH THEIR SECRET PHONE HOME ABILITY, then its ahoy me'hearties all over again as ppl don't want restrictions placed on property they own so the pirate bay increases its userbase!

Why are they not happy, the answer is simple, the RIAA (BPI) and MPAA what to make it so you have 1 licence per device then that device will require 1 licence per user so they can generate huge revenues from this anti consumer tactic, sony with the PSN release of warhawk has already started down this road and now it looks like the MPAA has won its format of choice for Next-Gen movie players (Blu)Drm-Ray things can only get worse in regards to what you are allowed to do with property WE own!
From what I have seen its more difficult to sell STEAM crippled games than share games, also you must udnerstand that warhawk is more a free MMO than anything else so limiting it some is not that draconain.

At least the retail version is not handicap if it was then ya that would be questionable.

49.1.2008 11:45

Quote:
Quote:
While consumers feel it should be there right to make as many copies of (legally purchased) music as they want, representatives of the recording industry are less enthusiastic about the idea.

Geoff Taylor, CEO of the U.K. equivalent of the RIAA - the BPI, noted the industry's dissapointment that the government is considering additional consumer rights with no additional compensation for copyright holders. Lord Triesman doesn't agree.

Ok so you can move the media YOU own to your mp3 player but the BPI (Sony, Warner, Universal & EMI basically the RIAA a$$holes) are not happy with the measure being drawn up by our government to protect us from BIG MEDIA screwing us all over and dictating through DRM what we can actually do with OUR property, and that's the thing, it is still illegal in the UK to circumvent(bypass) any form of DRM so you see what is going to happen, this is a pathetic pointless law that will protect none of our rights as all that will happen is more SONY DRM XCP ROOTKITS WITH THEIR SECRET PHONE HOME ABILITY, then its ahoy me'hearties all over again as ppl don't want restrictions placed on property they own so the pirate bay increases its userbase!

Why are they not happy, the answer is simple, the RIAA (BPI) and MPAA what to make it so you have 1 licence per device then that device will require 1 licence per user so they can generate huge revenues from this anti consumer tactic, sony with the PSN release of warhawk has already started down this road and now it looks like the MPAA has won its format of choice for Next-Gen movie players (Blu)Drm-Ray things can only get worse in regards to what you are allowed to do with property WE own!

Actually more and more companies are doing away with DRM because of its restrictions and profits lost. They will never completely move away from this type of strategy but DRM is definitely losing its ground in the media market. Everyday there is some kind of new article where they are denouncing the use of DRM through media downloads or CD/DVD's sold due to its limits.

59.1.2008 15:14
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by spydah :
Actually more and more companies are doing away with DRM because of its restrictions and profits lost. They will never completely move away from this type of strategy but DRM is definitely losing its ground in the media market. Everyday there is some kind of new article where they are denouncing the use of DRM through media downloads or CD/DVD's sold due to its limits.
The law only allows you to shift it, if there is no DRM on the media and with the way that the RIAA(BPI)/MPAA fix the prices around the globe, DRM is here to stay, just as region coding on Blu-Ray is used to fix prices!

Apple lowers UK iTunes prices, points finger at labels
Originally posted by hyperlink above:
The decision comes as part of a deal with EU authorities, who have been looking into iTunes pricing practices since April 2007. The European Commission took Apple, EMI, Sony BMG, Universal, and Warner (the Big Four labels) to task for their uneven pricing, saying that it went directly against EU competition rules. At the time, Apple said that it agreed with the EU, but that the music labels would not allow it to offer uniform pricing between the UK and the rest of Europe.
But as all labels drop DRM from music sony has yet again showed us all how anti consumer they are by only going to allow us to download albums and not pick and choose the singles we want! this will go the same way as Sony's anti consumer ATRAC propertarian DRM download service did last year! this time its got a new name MusicPass.com and a downloaded album sells for just $12.99 in the US did anyone tell sony that there are little overheads in distributing via the net and therefore it should be cheaper for the consumer?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7175338.stm

Originally posted by above link:
Those buying the gift cards will be able to download albums from the MusicPass.com website. At launch 37 albums from artists such as Celine Dion, Avril Lavigne and Bruce Springsteen will be available.

Customers will be able to get access to the downloadable tracks by typing in an identifying number on the back of the gift card. Cards are expected to cost $12.99 (6.58) and will be available from stores such as Best Buy and Target.

The service will launch in Canada in late January but Sony has not announced plans to launch it in Europe.

"The MP3 files delivered through MusicPass play on computers, as well as on all MP3 players, including iPods," said Thomas Hesse, president of SONY BMG US, in a statement.

Sony is the last of the big four record labels to launch music services with tracks free of digital locks that limit what people can do with the music they buy.
this has to be the worst ever solution to stopping pirating i have ever seen and its no wonder the pirate bay is seeing an ever increasing amount of daily traffic when you are treated like this!

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 09 Jan 2008 @ 15:16

69.1.2008 15:20

Quote:
Start forcing the media conglomerates to take care of and share more money with artist's and creators of content!!!!!
If you "force" the record companies to pay the artists more, fewer artists will get record deals. And, The artists are not forced to sign a contract with the record company. If they are offered a contract and they don't like the deal, they can remain independent.

The record companies are currently loosing money, and even during "good times" they loose money on most new artists they sign-up. The profits from a few superstars pay the way for everybody else, and allow the record companies to give a "chance" to new artists. Once a superstar's contract expires, they can negotiate a new contract for a much bigger share of the profits.


Imagine what would happen if the record companies were forced to pay every artist a $10 million signing bonus... There would only be one or two new artists (if any) signed-up each year. It's like minimum wage... You can force an employer to pay a minimum wage, but you can't force a private employer to give anybody a job.

79.1.2008 15:37
nobrainer
Inactive

@ DVDdoug

the big media is stealing monies from artists left right and centre, since when were they elected the gatekeepers of our culture soley to feed us manufactured garbage then dictate as sony is doing (my above post) to purchase the whole album (not individual songs like iTunes) at retail shop prices when they are clearly having less overheads because of their new download service!

Radiohead: Artists often screwed by digital downloads

Originally posted by above link:
You might think, if you didn't work in the music business, that famous artists stand to make mad cash from popular albums on iTunes and other digital storefronts. Sadly, that's not the case, and Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke has spent the last week calling out the labels for it. He recently told BBC Radio 4 that "the big infrastructure of the music business has not addressed the way artists communicate directly with their fans. In fact, they seem to basically get in the way. Not only do they get in the way, but they take all the cash."

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 09 Jan 2008 @ 15:45

810.1.2008 1:34

Quote:
codifying existing caselaw into written law,
You may have a typo there vurbal. :)

All in all this article shows at least they are consulting on how to improve this law so that it can best fit today's society.

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