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U.S. Military replaced YouTube with TroopTube

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 12 Nov 2008 3:28 User comments (8)

U.S. Military replaced YouTube with TroopTube Last year the U.S. Military moved to block access to YouTube from troops and government employees, citing bandwidth usage problems with the services. Now, in co-operation with Seattle startup Delve Networks, it has launched a video sharing website for troops, their families and supporters. Members of the branches of the armed forces, their families, civilian Defense Department employees and supporters can join the service and upload videos.
TroopTube is tightly monitored however, with all video submissions being reviewed by Pentagon employees before they are added to filter out everything from threats to national security to copyright infringing content. Delve developed the technology to approve and sort incoming videos, as well as technology that makes several different video sizes and streams whichever is best suited for the users' Internet connection.

Delve Chief Executive Alex Castro called TroopTube a "retention tool" which is aimed at a new generation of soldiers who bring laptops and other portable gadgets to the front line with them. "A lot of people are excited in the company to be doing something for the people who make sacrifices," said Castro. "We're proud of this."

Last year the Pentagon opted to block YouTube and other video sharing sites, as well as social networking sites such as MySpace, citing security fears and bandwidth problems.

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8 user comments

112.11.2008 15:04

This sounds like a very good idea. I was in the service, and when you are away from your family, it is about all you can think about. "The letters just don't come quick enough". And why not use technology like this, keeps the soldiers mind off of personal things a little better, and helps them concentrate on the job at hand.

212.11.2008 18:30

Strictly a control issue, nothing more. Serves no purpose whatsoever, other than to keep government activities even more concealed then they already are.

The more they hide and cover-up, the more corrupt we know they are.

312.11.2008 18:47

Originally posted by skeil909:
Strictly a control issue, nothing more. Serves no purpose whatsoever, other than to keep government activities even more concealed then they already are.

The more they hide and cover-up, the more corrupt we know they are.
Indeed.

Also, "Last year the U.S. Military moved to block access to YouTube from troops and government employees, citing bandwidth usage problems with the services."

The government having issues with bandwidth... *coughbullshitcough*

413.11.2008 3:24

Well out in he boonies of Iraq sat feeds need to be used for..... I dunno..."business" ....other than that the rule is over reaching but I do think most bases let you buy local ISP services so itsnot as bad as it seems o the surface..

513.11.2008 15:27

While I think the name is a little silly, the core technology does seem good. Will be interested to see if other large organizations adopt this closed system video sharing. I just wonder how easy it is to transfer these videos to YouTube, and is that a security concern for the military?

Also curious to see what YouTube's competitive response will be, if any.

614.11.2008 18:35

imo the only reason the military/government is doing this is so that we don't see all the bs some of the jackasses are doing over there. I'm sure some of you remember all the videos of a bunch of 18 year old troops over there humiliating people for fun, throwing rocks at animals and laughing, another of a Humvee ramming through traffic for fun; or the infamous video of the marine pitching this little puppy off a cliff.

718.11.2008 15:28

Our tax dollars at work.

818.11.2008 16:10

Missing the point I think YT takes more bandwidth than its worth so on army bandwidth its blocked, non army bandwidth its not blocked.

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