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Video Daily: Sony launches 'PlayStation Move' motion controller

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 11 Mar 2010 12:23 User comments (19)

Video Daily: Sony launches 'PlayStation Move' motion controller Sony has launched their highly-anticipated motion controller, the PlayStation Move, a system that should rival the Wii and Microsoft's upcoming Natal motion system.
Says Peter Dille, senior vice president of marketing for Sony Computer Entertainment: "The migration path from the Wii household to the PlayStation 3 household is a pretty natural path, partly because of the experience that you can get on the PlayStation Move but also because of the content that we find on PlayStation 3."

As viewed in the demo video, the Move is used in conjunction with the PlayStation Eye camera and allows for real-time tracking of the player's body movements. As for accuracy?

"Nothing has ever been this precise," say Shuhei Yoshida, president of Sony Computer Electronics Worldwide Studios.

Standalone prices were not revealed but Dille says that a "starter bundle" including a game, the PS Eye and the Move will retail for under $100.

Big-time publishers such as Activision, EA and Square Enix are already creating games for use with the Move, among 36 developers that have already signed on.

Vids via Engadget:


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19 user comments

111.3.2010 13:20

I only have this to say:

Whenever these gadgets are not part of the original console launch, they usually do not do well and/or are not well supported. See EyeToy, Super Scope 6, 32X, Sega CD and countless others for examples.

The only peripherals that have done well are the physical controller replacements for Xbox and the PS3. MS replaced the "Duke" with Controller S, because "Duke" was awful! Sony likewise listened to outcry for a DualShock 3.

It will be interesting to see how this all plays out.

211.3.2010 13:50

Looks pretty dang cool

311.3.2010 16:22

"They will be separately challenged because the motion-enabled part of their business will only be a small part of their line. For Nintendo, it's core to what they do".

411.3.2010 17:26

Originally posted by themind:
"They will be separately challenged because the motion-enabled part of their business will only be a small part of their line. For Nintendo, it's core to what they do".
or from another point of view what hes saying to someone who can read between the lines is :apart from having a real console with true HD graphics blu ray and an HDD they will now add the only thing we had and they didnt to make our products completely obsolete unless you count a few first party games like mario and zelda"
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 11 Mar 2010 @ 17:27

511.3.2010 20:20

we have to realise that even though playstation and xbox are better gaming machines, nintendo has the revolutions in interface. i mean correct me if im wrong but, nintendo were the first to go from box with joystick like atari to controller. they were the first to use analogue sticks, they were the first to use motion control. just wait. the next revolution in gaming control will be from nintendo

611.3.2010 22:23

Yeah, I'm not really sure how many people are going to invest in Move or Natal. Natal is supposedly still having lag/accuracy issues, but is a one-time cost (~$80-120, depending on what ROI MS is looking for) whereas Move will be ~$80-100 for a PS Eye + 1 Move controller, but then any needed add'l Move controllers will probably be ~$40 ea....and the earlier demos they showed of archery or sword fighting (w/ shield) required 2 controllers for 1 person. It's really a wait-and-see thing still.

711.3.2010 23:03

i think that big glowing ball at the tip of the Move is VERY distracting..i mean, really?

811.3.2010 23:28

Originally posted by SProdigy:

Whenever these gadgets are not part of the original console launch, they usually do not do well and/or are not well supported. See EyeToy, Super Scope 6, 32X, Sega CD and countless others for examples
The eyetoy was part of the PS3 launch, and the super scope ('super scope 6' was the game that came with it) was part of the SNES launch (it was not yet available, but it was on the box art for the SNES).

I think that if sony follows through with this, they could make some serious money...that is, if they offer the controlers in various sizes and forms (baseball bat, hockey stick, etc). Just look how much guitar hero made just on those fake guitars! As long as it looks like a TV remote, it will just be a Wii-copy; but without the stepboard.

912.3.2010 2:48

Josipher, the Wii is a real console. This may help you if you have any questions.

1012.3.2010 8:14

Originally posted by wmccusker:
we have to realise that even though playstation and xbox are better gaming machines, nintendo has the revolutions in interface. i mean correct me if im wrong but, nintendo were the first to go from box with joystick like atari to controller. they were the first to use analogue sticks, they were the first to use motion control. just wait. the next revolution in gaming control will be from nintendo
The big N does start everything. They are not afraid of taking risks. BUt what usually happens is that the copiers always do it better.

1112.3.2010 9:06

If i can't shoot people with it, then it's no good.

1212.3.2010 10:05

I posted this in another thread but it fits here and is topical ~

Quote:
Actually if you want to be accurate then you would have to cite that Sony actually began their Motion Controller Last Gen with the PS EyeToy and had started developing/using a Controller device with it a minimum of over 8 years ago (I have numerous videos, links & such but I think we can agree this is truthful information). So while Ninty definitely are currently the most successful, to omit that Sony hadn't pioneered their own viable platform accessory in this field (and probably influenced other companies) today and more specifically because Dr. Richard Marx did show games and discussed ideas VERY similar to what the Wii has done and absolutely what MS is doing with Natal (since the tech in Natal was actually used in early PS2 Motion Control/EyeToy development and is not exactly doing anything different from what it has already accomplished) again you can't just use a slighted opinion or fail to acknowledge the facts as a valid explanation, alternative or excuse. If anything it's the other way around and MS/Ninty are the alternatives because Sony is a vital key part to where they are at, or are going today!
I am not all that interested in the PS Move currently because of the "hokie" shovelware Wii style games that have been shown so far (except for Socom 4 which looks promising at least). I will hold quite a bit of reservation until I start to see games that are from quality devs who have a track record of putting time and devotion into their games (which shows) like the Insomniac's, Naughty Dog's, SOE/A's who have top notch titles like Ape Escape, Echochrome 2, Little Big Planet, Ratchet, Pain, Flower, Sly, High Velocity Bowling, Resident Evil & Jack/Daxter to help me decide if it warrants a purchase...I mean hell I own a Wii so why wouldn't I want a more accurate and precise capable version anyway of what it can do with better and more frequent releases!?

Edit: Just found out this juicy bit of info ~




Disney/Pixar's Toy Story 3 for PS Move looks to be huge...REALLY huge. Because when you think about how beautiful & amazing some titles like Little Big Planet, Uncharted 2 & God of War 3 look/are, then you couple that with TS3 coming from a house of quality & stature like Disney/Pixar & I would have to say that PS Move actually does have a VERY good chance at staking a strong claim this gen! Think about the possibilities!? Disney games with the quality of Pixar animation with the added finite accuracy that the PS Move has over it's competition...it's pretty interesting I believe, honestly.


Edit 2: Here's another piece of info that I find quite interesting ~

Quote:
PlayStation Move requires 1-2 MB of system memory

Sony's GDC panel "Introducing the PlayStation Motion Controller was exactly that: An introduction to the newly named Move peripheral. David Coombes, Kirk Bender and Anton Mikhailov showcased a number of impressive tech demos, many of which demonstrated the Move's incredible precision and low latency. One of the most impressive demos showcased full body tracking using an on-screen body puppet, not unlike one of Project Natal's tech demos.

Body tracking is made possible by combining the Move and PS3's head tracking capability. According to the presentation, the PS3 can also detect faces, going so far as to identify individuals through face contour and feature detection. The software will be able to recognize gender, age, smiles and when eyes open and close.

Coombes explained that all the calculations necessary to handle image processing are done by the Cell CPU, which apparently excels at the doing floating point calculations. The raw data can be processed incredibly quickly by the PS3, taking "under a frame" to translate to a game experience. And while Mikhailov didn't reveal how much of the CPU's overall power the Move controller requires, he did reveal that the memory demands are truly "insignificant" -- 1-2 MB of system memory.
I forgot how that the PS Eye can do Head Tracking and how it can correlate into the PS Move especially when I always tout about it being implemented into GT5...so it's weird I didn't put 2 & 2 together here!
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 12 Mar 2010 @ 12:26

1312.3.2010 12:30

Originally posted by embo22000:
They are not afraid of taking risks. BUt what usually happens is that the copiers always do it better.
I beg to differ. Sony and MS take risks. Nintendo doesn't, and they've proven it. The risk was in the battle for top next gen technology.
Originally posted by Wiki:
The console was conceived in 2001, as the Nintendo GameCube was first seeing release. According to an interview with Nintendo's game designer Shigeru Miyamoto, the concept involved focusing on a new form of player interaction. "The consensus was that power isn't everything for a console. Too many powerful consoles can't coexist. It's like having only ferocious dinosaurs. They might fight and hasten their own extinction."[12]
They way I read that is "we can't afford to take the risk of competing at the same level as the others...." Adding a new "way of playing" an outdated system is playing it safe if you ask me. All business has risk, but they chose the lowest risk path. They were living large in their glory days when their competition was primarily Sega. But add 2 more players and the competition gets a lot tougher. It's common knowledge that the Gamecube failed against the XBOX and PS2. Another console failure would have probably been the nail in the coffin and they would have gone the way of Sega. They needed to stay in the game while not risking being tangled up in an all-out battle with the two remaining console heavyweights. How do you do that? Well, as we all have seen, they made little tweaks to their Gamecube, slapped on a new coat of paint and sold it for pennies. When you look at the gaming climate at the time, there is almost no risk in that. Many people were put off by the enormous price tag of these new next gen consoles (I'm a gaming enthusiast and could not afford a 360 on release date). With the release price of the 360 1 year earlier and the rumored price of the PS3 ($599), their opportunity presented itself and they wrapped their entire marketing campaign around it - the cheaper console for family fun. Brilliant marketing - throw some grandparents with their grandchildren playing Wii sports in a commercial and it just warms the heart, right? It panned out for them. They have been making profits hand over fist way before MS and Sony.

So is Nintendo a risk taker? I think not. You're welcome to disagree, but there is too much information available to show otherwise for me.

But I digress.... :P

I'm excited to see what the Move can do. I have a Wii and PS3. The Wii is just for exercise. My kids don't even like it. They spend their video game time designing complex stuff in Little Big Planet that I can't even do. They are going to love Toy Story 3, and the Move may make it so much more enjoyable.

1412.3.2010 15:37

Quote:
Originally posted by embo22000:
They are not afraid of taking risks. BUt what usually happens is that the copiers always do it better.
I beg to differ. Sony and MS take risks. Nintendo doesn't, and they've proven it. The risk was in the battle for top next gen technology.
Originally posted by Wiki:
The console was conceived in 2001, as the Nintendo GameCube was first seeing release. According to an interview with Nintendo's game designer Shigeru Miyamoto, the concept involved focusing on a new form of player interaction. "The consensus was that power isn't everything for a console. Too many powerful consoles can't coexist. It's like having only ferocious dinosaurs. They might fight and hasten their own extinction."[12]
They way I read that is "we can't afford to take the risk of competing at the same level as the others...." Adding a new "way of playing" an outdated system is playing it safe if you ask me. All business has risk, but they chose the lowest risk path. They were living large in their glory days when their competition was primarily Sega. But add 2 more players and the competition gets a lot tougher. It's common knowledge that the Gamecube failed against the XBOX and PS2. Another console failure would have probably been the nail in the coffin and they would have gone the way of Sega. They needed to stay in the game while not risking being tangled up in an all-out battle with the two remaining console heavyweights. How do you do that? Well, as we all have seen, they made little tweaks to their Gamecube, slapped on a new coat of paint and sold it for pennies. When you look at the gaming climate at the time, there is almost no risk in that. Many people were put off by the enormous price tag of these new next gen consoles (I'm a gaming enthusiast and could not afford a 360 on release date). With the release price of the 360 1 year earlier and the rumored price of the PS3 ($599), their opportunity presented itself and they wrapped their entire marketing campaign around it - the cheaper console for family fun. Brilliant marketing - throw some grandparents with their grandchildren playing Wii sports in a commercial and it just warms the heart, right? It panned out for them. They have been making profits hand over fist way before MS and Sony.

So is Nintendo a risk taker? I think not. You're welcome to disagree, but there is too much information available to show otherwise for me.

But I digress.... :P

I'm excited to see what the Move can do. I have a Wii and PS3. The Wii is just for exercise. My kids don't even like it. They spend their video game time designing complex stuff in Little Big Planet that I can't even do. They are going to love Toy Story 3, and the Move may make it so much more enjoyable.
Nooooo Risk. Waht the heck do you mean. The wii sucks period and yet it sells like hot cakes. It was new way of playing games. new controller. plus people has to move to play not sit in their asses and relax. They sell an outdated machine with a new way of playing games that's risk buddy.

1512.3.2010 16:30

Quote:
Quote:
Originally posted by embo22000:
They are not afraid of taking risks. BUt what usually happens is that the copiers always do it better.
I beg to differ. Sony and MS take risks. Nintendo doesn't, and they've proven it. The risk was in the battle for top next gen technology.
Originally posted by Wiki:
The console was conceived in 2001, as the Nintendo GameCube was first seeing release. According to an interview with Nintendo's game designer Shigeru Miyamoto, the concept involved focusing on a new form of player interaction. "The consensus was that power isn't everything for a console. Too many powerful consoles can't coexist. It's like having only ferocious dinosaurs. They might fight and hasten their own extinction."[12]
They way I read that is "we can't afford to take the risk of competing at the same level as the others...." Adding a new "way of playing" an outdated system is playing it safe if you ask me. All business has risk, but they chose the lowest risk path. They were living large in their glory days when their competition was primarily Sega. But add 2 more players and the competition gets a lot tougher. It's common knowledge that the Gamecube failed against the XBOX and PS2. Another console failure would have probably been the nail in the coffin and they would have gone the way of Sega. They needed to stay in the game while not risking being tangled up in an all-out battle with the two remaining console heavyweights. How do you do that? Well, as we all have seen, they made little tweaks to their Gamecube, slapped on a new coat of paint and sold it for pennies. When you look at the gaming climate at the time, there is almost no risk in that. Many people were put off by the enormous price tag of these new next gen consoles (I'm a gaming enthusiast and could not afford a 360 on release date). With the release price of the 360 1 year earlier and the rumored price of the PS3 ($599), their opportunity presented itself and they wrapped their entire marketing campaign around it - the cheaper console for family fun. Brilliant marketing - throw some grandparents with their grandchildren playing Wii sports in a commercial and it just warms the heart, right? It panned out for them. They have been making profits hand over fist way before MS and Sony.

So is Nintendo a risk taker? I think not. You're welcome to disagree, but there is too much information available to show otherwise for me.

But I digress.... :P

I'm excited to see what the Move can do. I have a Wii and PS3. The Wii is just for exercise. My kids don't even like it. They spend their video game time designing complex stuff in Little Big Planet that I can't even do. They are going to love Toy Story 3, and the Move may make it so much more enjoyable.
Nooooo Risk. Waht the heck do you mean. The wii sucks period and yet it sells like hot cakes. It was new way of playing games. new controller. plus people has to move to play not sit in their asses and relax. They sell an outdated machine with a new way of playing games that's risk buddy.
I specifically said that they chose the lowest risk path. When I said that Nintendo is not a risk taker, it was based on the general understanding that all business is a risk anyway and Nintendo didn't make any decisions that were really above the base risk of selling a new product. When you think about it, there plan was almost fail-safe. How did I come to this opinion? Not sure how to spell it out any clearer than I already did above.

The Wii being outdated wasn't as apparent to most at release as it is now. It was released when the HD market was in its infancy. Do you think this was a coincidence? I don't. Nintendo saw a window of opportunity and exploited it. My opinion is that the popularity of the Wii is inversely proportional to HDTV penetration.

If all you have to offer is "the wii sucks period" then there's no point in discussing anything further.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 12 Mar 2010 @ 17:45

1612.3.2010 18:48

Originally posted by SProdigy:
I only have this to say:

Whenever these gadgets are not part of the original console launch, they usually do not do well and/or are not well supported. See EyeToy, Super Scope 6, 32X, Sega CD and countless others for examples.

The only peripherals that have done well are the physical controller replacements for Xbox and the PS3. MS replaced the "Duke" with Controller S, because "Duke" was awful! Sony likewise listened to outcry for a DualShock 3.

It will be interesting to see how this all plays out.
Yes wtf was sony thinking not including a vibration ability with that original ps3 controller?

Anyways you're right about console add-ons. Developers don't want to develop a game that utilizes add-ons since only a fraction of the people with the console will own the add-on and only a fraction of those with the add-on will be interested in their game. Likewise nobody wants to drop $50 on an add-on if they don't see any appealing games for it.

The only add-ons I've ever really seen work well were something like the memory expansion pack for the N64. It wasn't required for most games, and the games that did require it included the expansion pack.

1712.3.2010 19:20

Originally posted by bomber991:
Yes wtf was sony thinking not including a vibration ability with that original ps3 controller?

Anyways you're right about console add-ons. Developers don't want to develop a game that utilizes add-ons since only a fraction of the people with the console will own the add-on and only a fraction of those with the add-on will be interested in their game. Likewise nobody wants to drop $50 on an add-on if they don't see any appealing games for it.

The only add-ons I've ever really seen work well were something like the memory expansion pack for the N64. It wasn't required for most games, and the games that did require it included the expansion pack.
All 3 manufacturers were being sued by Immersion and Sony gambled on not implementing it so they wouldn't have to pay royalties etc. while the other 2 gave in and payed up. Some time later Immersion saw how much money they were going to end up not receiving by leaving that option on the table and decided to cut Sony a deal so they can release a Dual Shock 3. It really had more to do with Immersion than with Sony per se.

1812.3.2010 21:07

In Fall of 2010 the Playstation 3 will become self aware!! Judgement day looms!! There is no fate but what you make!! ---Chikn

1912.3.2010 21:14

Nintendo bought or borrowed a lot of its supposed 'original' tech, so they're not THAT original. They stick more to proprietary than the others too.

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