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Senator: ESRB game ratings 'biased'

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 30 Oct 2010 22:55 User comments (7)

Senator: ESRB game ratings 'biased' The California State Senator behind a controversial piece of legislation concerning the sale of violent video games to minors has claimed that ESRB guideline ratings are "biased".
San Francisco democrat Leland Yee said that his new piece of legislation was needed because the ESRB age-rating scheme is "rather biased." He told GameSpot that since the games industry itself funds the ESRB, it is natural to assume that the ratings titles receive are biased.

"Clearly, they're not going to legitimately and appropriately place any markings on any video games, because it's in the interest of the video [game] industry to sell as many video games as possible," he said. "You never heard of an AO rating whatsoever, because that would limit your market share." (Have a look here, Senator)

Lee claims that his bill is only targeted at a small section of ultraviolent video games, and evoked memories of the overblown "hot coffee" controversy which saw gamers using downloadable patches to unlock a mini-game featuring clothed sex scenes in the "Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas" title.

Yee believes that video games should be more scrutinized in this way than movies because you are unable to look at all the content in one sitting.

"For parents, it's hard to really know what the content is as opposed to a movie. Parents can sit and watch a movie. Within a game, you have to be pretty sophisticated to get to a level to see some of the more atrocious behaviour."

He said that his bill does not mean minors will be unable to get ultraviolent video games, they will instead just need to convince their parents to get them instead.

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7 user comments

131.10.2010 0:19

No one cares what he thinks.

231.10.2010 0:25

Quote:
He said that his bill does not mean minors will be unable to get ultraviolent video games, they will instead just need to convince their parents to get them instead.
they'll just get them from Amazon or Ebay, or another online retailer.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 31 Oct 2010 @ 0:26

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331.10.2010 1:42

Originally posted by DXR88:
Quote:
He said that his bill does not mean minors will be unable to get ultraviolent video games, they will instead just need to convince their parents to get them instead.
they'll just get them from Amazon or Ebay, or another online retailer.
...Or they will just spend the money on drugs.

431.10.2010 2:23

Originally posted by DXR88:
Quote:
He said that his bill does not mean minors will be unable to get ultraviolent video games, they will instead just need to convince their parents to get them instead.
they'll just get them from Amazon or Ebay, or another online retailer.
Meh I suppose its probably similar to going to a rated R movie, or buying a Parental Advisory CD. it all depends on who is working the counter. If they are worried about the repercussions there going to card you, but then theres always that employee or employees who just dont give a...and are going to sell the movie ticket or the game to a 15 year old kid, or younger. Its not like they cant hop from store to store til they find a clerk who will sell to them.

531.10.2010 8:34

Originally posted by hikaricor:
No one cares what he thinks.
Tru dat, Just some guy hatin'.

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631.10.2010 9:02

Originally posted by bam431:

Originally posted by hikaricor:
No one cares what he thinks.
Tru dat, Just some guy hatin'.
The problem is that he does not think...he just says whatever the public wants to hear...and the public wants to hear about how evil videogames cause murder, terrorism, flag burning, and gays. This is the crowd that lines up for book burnings...and they are in the majority.

731.10.2010 10:38

We are talking teenagers here. I know there are parents out of touch in their 30s and cannot tell what games are what. My wife is one of them, but I have been around games most of my life. We need government interaction on video games? Really? I remember growing up Leisure Suit Larry, was pretty raunchy. Police Quest was pretty graphic. Police Quest did not have a "warning". Parents need to buck up and get involved in their kids lives. (Off soap box for now)

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