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Netflix will shut down proxy users

Written by Andre Yoskowitz @ 14 Jan 2016 10:28 User comments (5)

Netflix will shut down proxy users

Netflix, which now offers their streaming service in 190 countries, says it will do its best to shut down proxy users who use the services to get around country-based content licensing restrictions.
Within the next few weeks, Netflix subscribers using proxies will be restricted to content from just their own countries, however, it is unclear how Netflix will pull off the feat.

VP of content delivery architecture David Fullagar did note the bigger problem is that Netflix's catalog is not equal across the world, but that Netflix is actively working on the complicated world of global licensing deals.

"We are making progress in licensing content across the world... but we have a ways to go before we can offer people the same films and TV series everywhere," he wrote. "For now, given the historic practice of licensing content by geographic territories, the TV shows and movies we offer differ, to varying degrees, by territory. In the meantime, we will continue to respect and enforce content licensing by geographic location."



Source:
Variety

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5 user comments

115.1.2016 07:32

if the tv and movie catalogue was equal everywhere there wouldnt be the need for using proxies to access content. its impossible to believe that all of it shouldnt be available everywhere considering what a lot of it is. for example why should something like buffy, charmed and angel be only available in the u.s. and not parts of europe come on its back catalogue material...

215.1.2016 09:47

I have a client in the TV production and licensing business. Licenses are negotiated using very "old school" principles. I've seen titles licensed to very specific regions, broadcast methods and time frames. Every deal is different. It's ridiculously complex and all about maximizing revenue.

Netflix will be at the mercy of any existing deals when they license a movie or show. The content may have already been licensed (at a high price) in a specific region. This could prevent Netflix from licensing that content for a long time. In other cases a rival (like Amazon) may be willing to pay much more for a title in a region. This would leave Netflix only able to offer the title in other areas.

As much as it would be nice to say, Netflix just has to license content globally, I don't see that happening until the entire industry changes.

415.1.2016 17:49

Why would anyone use this crappy service ??? I don't get it ???

516.1.2016 14:44

Originally posted by ronhondo:
Why would anyone use this crappy service ??? I don't get it ???
Well, you're in a distinct minority there. Netflix is NOT hurting for cash.

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