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Massive data breach: 773 million accounts, with passwords, leaked from LinkedIn, Adobe, more - Test if your account is safe

Written by Petteri Pyyny @ 17 Jan 2019 4:16 User comments (5)

Massive data breach: 773 million accounts, with passwords, leaked from LinkedIn, Adobe, more - Test if your account is safe Troy Hunt has set up up a searchable database that contains a whopping 773 million breached login details. The data has been put together by combining various high profile data breaches from the past years, including the data breaches to LinkedIn and Adobe
The database that he calls "Collection #1" includes email addresses and passwords totalling 2,692,818,238 rows. Yes, you got that one right, more than two and a half billion details. When all the duplicates removed, it still leaves more than one billion login details (email address and password combination) to the database. And there are more than 700 million unique email addresses there, so some email addresses were breached in more than one data leak, with different password.

Mr. Hunt, who works as a regional director for Microsoft got the data from popular anonymous file sharing service MEGA and its origins, according to him, point to a popular hacker forum where the set of files is distributed openly among the hackers. Dataset in question is 87 gigabytes in size and has more than 12'000 files in it. He details the project in his own blog.



To help to indetify whether youre account has been breached, he has put together a website for anyone to test it:

Have I been Pwned?

Entering your email address there wont gather any data, but will simply tell you whether your account is one of those that have been including with this massive data collection - or not.

If your email address shows that you are in the list, it is highly recommended to change your passwords immediately across all business critical services. We recommend using password manager, something like LastPass, and to let it randomize you a different password for each service.

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5 user comments

118.1.2019 07:07

Has anyone done this? I always get nervous that this is a way to get more information from people.

218.1.2019 12:28

Originally posted by 8686:
Has anyone done this? I always get nervous that this is a way to get more information from people.
I have done it twice none of my info has ever been compromised. This site says I have been pawned five times. I do all my banking shopping and bill paying online. one of my bank accounts had my social security no. as a login ID since 1995 I just changed that last week. god protects fools and me!

318.1.2019 12:53

Thanks. I did it too. Same here, 5 pwnes. Good thing I use different passwords for everything.

419.1.2019 03:58

I've done it and found that my login has been compromised on 5 breached sites, no pastes. I'm not changing any of my passwords, though. I've been using my hotmail account for over 20 years now, and it stands to reason that it was compromised on this or that site at one time or another, but chances are I've changed my password there since then and am not exposed to any hacking. Obviously, I haven't noticed anything unusual in my logging on to my usual haunts. In my considered opinion, it would be a madness to start changing passwords on dozens of websites I frequent unless and until I notice any sign of something untoward going on.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 19 Jan 2019 @ 3:59

Demid

519.1.2019 11:58

2 pwnes on stealth accounts which I knew had been compromised prior through the Yahoo breach awhile back. Found one of my friends primary accounts had been hacked so notified him that there could be a problem, I'm sure he wasn't aware of this so all is good.

Thanks for the blog Petteri, good job.

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