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Ubisoft 'always connected' DRM cracked on first day

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 04 Mar 2010 11:27 User comments (35)

Ubisoft 'always connected' DRM cracked on first day In what has to be a gigantic embarrassment for the company, Ubisoft's highly criticized "always connected" DRM has been cracked on the first day of release of the game Silent Hunter 5: Battle of the Atlantic.
The publisher made headlines earlier this month when it announced the DRM which made it so gamers must be always connected to the Internet, or not be able to play the game. If you are ever disconnected from the Internet, you are forced back to the main menu, losing any progress you made between save points. The DRM was confirmed for Splinter Cell: Conviction, Silent Hunter 5: Battle of the Atlantic, Assassin's Creed 2, Prince of Persia: The Forgotten Sands and the all new Ghost Recon titles.

Yesterday, the pirated release, Silent Hunter 5 Battle of the Atlantic-SKIDROW, was made widely available, circumventing the DRM easily with a patched executable.

Ubisoft, however, is saying the pirated game is not fully complete.

"You have probably seen rumours on the web that Assassin's Creed II and Silent Hunter 5 have been cracked. Please know that this rumour is false and while a pirated version may seem to be complete at start up, any gamer who downloads and plays a cracked version will find that their version is not complete," said the company in a note.

Ubisoft just seems to be denial, as most downloaders are happy to post they are playing and enjoying the complete game, offline, and DRM-free.

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35 user comments

14.3.2010 11:31

haha...in ur face Ubisoft!

24.3.2010 12:16

Of course it's not complete, you can't use Ubi servers to save your game. :p

34.3.2010 12:29

I guess this game isn't designed for anyone that has a spotty ISP with frequent disconnects. Imagine losing hours of play because your Internet connection went down. Even if I were willing to buy this game, I'd still prefer a cracked version simply for this reason.

44.3.2010 12:31
RiaaScum
Inactive

Originally posted by Hyasuma:
haha...in ur face Ubisoft!
not really as they have blocked second hand sales by circumventing the first sale doctrine by bundling user specific pc software into a game, it has never been about piracy its all about control of the second hand market and removing our rights!

piracy was just the scare tactic used, ubisoft are just copying sony, microsoft the mpaa and the riaa.

obviously if a company sees another managing to remove customers rights they will simply follow.

dont purchase into DRM, dont purchase a PS3 or Blu-Ray as sony are at the fore front of anti consumer being the leading member of the MPAA & RIAA, introducing more bills via their lobbyists with their partners in crime Warner, Fox & Disney, but what sets them apart is that they control hardware specifications unlike most of the other media companies due to their immense weight & sway in the industry these are the ones to target.

54.3.2010 13:28

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This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 06 Sep 2013 @ 16:39

64.3.2010 14:53

To be honest, I think this absolutely PROMOTES piracy.

I feel like pirating these games (since they have been easily cracked already) simply because Ubisoft is being such a bitch.

They took steps backwards on this one.

There is indisputable proof that AAA games that have shipped with NO copy protection have sold JUST AS WELL, if not better than many hit titles that have copy protection in place.

Ubisoft needs a reality check.

The games aren't complete? I will believe that when I hear people having issues with the games. So far that is noone.

Thanks to the cracked 1.1 update, Silent Hunter 5 seems to be working a charm for those that have tried it.

It's too bad. Ubisoft used to be one of the game companies at the top of my list. Now they are right there near the bottom.

They are just trying hard to alienate their fans and the customaers that keep them in business, which if they keep this crap up, won't be all that much longer.

74.3.2010 14:54

I find it funny they are doing this on the PC mainly because all they are doing is losing profits by spending money on DRM thats easily "fixed" and sending away their PC consumers due to how bad the DRM is.

The 360 is even easier to fool than the PC so what are they trying to accomplish here other than inept vanity?

84.3.2010 17:56

I totally called this.

94.3.2010 18:58

sell your market share people ubisoft is going up in flames MUHAHAHAHA (wishful thinking =] )

104.3.2010 20:24

these companies wasting money trying to fight pirates are stupid. just give up. and accept the fact that a small number of ur games aren't gonna be sold. jeeze its freaken the twenty first century. these companies think they can outsmart homebrew hackers? gimmie a break! as far as i can tell if they made games like PS3 where u would have to download a giant 30 gig blu-ray image to play a game. assuming anyone could crack the ps3 operating system so it could run games. then there would be a way to win against pirates. because downloading a 30 gig game takes a very long time even on broadband.

114.3.2010 20:52
WierdName
Inactive

Well this is interesting: http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/UBI?countryCode=fr
Their stock doesn't seem to be too affected... I wonder how long it will be until there is a noticeable effect. If they surprisingly don't go under, it would be a great time to buy in.

124.3.2010 21:42

Yeah, don't they realize that they are going around in circles with us consumers. They try to stifle piracy, only then to alienate their customers with a required strict DRM, which in turn, makes us pirate the games to get the features that we want. In turn, when the fat-cat executives find out that the game is cracked, they make up some lousy excuse as to why it happened in the first place to begin with by blaming someone, when they should be looking at themselves to blame.

134.3.2010 22:48

Originally posted by WierdName:
Well this is interesting: http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/UBI?countryCode=fr
Their stock doesn't seem to be too affected... I wonder how long it will be until there is a noticeable effect. If they surprisingly don't go under, it would be a great time to buy in.
They were a $75 stock in 2008 lol

144.3.2010 23:25
WierdName
Inactive

Quote:
Originally posted by WierdName:
Well this is interesting: http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/UBI?countryCode=fr
Their stock doesn't seem to be too affected... I wonder how long it will be until there is a noticeable effect. If they surprisingly don't go under, it would be a great time to buy in.
They were a $75 stock in 2008 lol
Heh, 'were' is the key word.

155.3.2010 0:51

Quote:
Quote:
Originally posted by WierdName:
Well this is interesting: http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/UBI?countryCode=fr
Their stock doesn't seem to be too affected... I wonder how long it will be until there is a noticeable effect. If they surprisingly don't go under, it would be a great time to buy in.
They were a $75 stock in 2008 lol
Heh, 'were' is the key word.
Stock prices are a terrible way to see how well a company is doing...Enron was millions in the whole when their stock was at all-time highs!

I suspect the true goal of all this is to prevent people from buying PC games, as PC games are a lot more affordable than PS3 games...and the PS3 versions of these games do not have these problems. Of course, all this really does is to make the PC versions free.

165.3.2010 0:52

Quote:
Quote:
Originally posted by WierdName:
Well this is interesting: http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/UBI?countryCode=fr
Their stock doesn't seem to be too affected... I wonder how long it will be until there is a noticeable effect. If they surprisingly don't go under, it would be a great time to buy in.
They were a $75 stock in 2008 lol
Heh, 'were' is the key word.
Yeah just funny to see, as I can't imagine why they were so overpriced.

175.3.2010 0:53

This is great!
Sorry UBi! I will never purchase any game with these insane DRM problems. You just lost a sale for Assasins Creed 2.
Hope they have an all time low in PC game sales with this garbage!!

185.3.2010 1:23

Honestly Ubisoft has only themselves to blame. See, pirate groups LOVE the challenge of being "first" to have a 0-day release and the thrill of cracking tough DRM is like setting a bowl of ice cream in front of a starving cat. They painted a big red target on their backs when they announced this draconian DRM and well, this is the result!

I am not really into the assassin's creed series (more into old school rpgs and rts), but maybe I'll download the cracked version just to see if it was worth it to UBisoft to implement so much drm. The way Ubisoft carried on, you'd think the drm was to prevent first generation holodeck technology from leaking to the interwebs.

195.3.2010 1:30

Originally posted by windsong:
first generation holodeck technology

...that would so coool :P

205.3.2010 5:45
RiaaScum
Inactive

Quote:
I suspect the true goal of all this is to prevent people from buying PC games, as PC games are a lot more affordable than PS3 games...and the PS3 versions of these games do not have these problems. Of course, all this really does is to make the PC versions free.
thats because pc titles do not have to pay sony, nintendo, microsoft, etc licensing fees to be used on their hardware.

this is why pc titles are 20 to 30 cheaper

imagine the cost if pc developers had to pay every pc manufacturer for rights to make software for their hardware!

so when you are complaining about game prices remember its the console makers that dictate the high prices, these fees should be scrapped and monies should be made from the hardware including peripherals, first party software and the sale of dev kits, how much money is enough for these goons?
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 05 Mar 2010 @ 10:12

215.3.2010 13:35

Quote:

so when you are complaining about game prices remember its the console makers that dictate the high prices, these fees should be scrapped and monies should be made from the hardware including peripherals, first party software and the sale of dev kits, how much money is enough for these goons?
The problem with that is that pretty much all game system makers lose a decent chunk of money on every console they sell. The depend on these game companies paying royalties, otherwise they couldn't make consoles and we would lose thevideo game market. Peripherals can only pay for so much. As much as it sucks to pay more for a console title, we need to if we want to keep the concole market around.

225.3.2010 13:44
WierdName
Inactive

Quote:
Quote:

so when you are complaining about game prices remember its the console makers that dictate the high prices, these fees should be scrapped and monies should be made from the hardware including peripherals, first party software and the sale of dev kits, how much money is enough for these goons?
The problem with that is that pretty much all game system makers lose a decent chunk of money on every console they sell. The depend on these game companies paying royalties, otherwise they couldn't make consoles and we would lose thevideo game market. Peripherals can only pay for so much. As much as it sucks to pay more for a console title, we need to if we want to keep the concole market around.
I have to agree, as much as it sucks paying extra for a console version, that's part of how the manufacturer regains losses. The console maker did create the console and so gets royalties from games on it. What's a fair amount and if/when they get enough if debatable. But they do have to regain losses from the console sales if they are going to support it and develop new ones. The real money to make up for the losses comes from the royalties. For most people, the console is also more powerful than their computer. So the console version is usually better quality than what their computer can push. My computer for one, in all seriousness, can't do half of what the PS3 is capable of. So when I have to pay that extra bit over a PC copy, I'm getting far better graphics that anything my computer could do. There is a point when they just become greedy though, but where that point sits is debatable.

235.3.2010 13:57
RiaaScum
Inactive

Originally posted by WeirdName:
Quote:
Quote:

so when you are complaining about game prices remember its the console makers that dictate the high prices, these fees should be scrapped and monies should be made from the hardware including peripherals, first party software and the sale of dev kits, how much money is enough for these goons?
The problem with that is that pretty much all game system makers lose a decent chunk of money on every console they sell. The depend on these game companies paying royalties, otherwise they couldn't make consoles and we would lose thevideo game market. Peripherals can only pay for so much. As much as it sucks to pay more for a console title, we need to if we want to keep the concole market around.
I have to agree, as much as it sucks paying extra for a console version, that's part of how the manufacturer regains losses. The console maker did create the console and so gets royalties from games on it. What's a fair amount and if/when they get enough if debatable. But they do have to regain losses from the console sales if they are going to support it and develop new ones. The real money to make up for the losses comes from the royalties. For most people, the console is also more powerful than their computer. So the console version is usually better quality than what their computer can push. My computer for one, in all seriousness, can't do half of what the PS3 is capable of. So when I have to pay that extra bit over a PC copy, I'm getting far better graphics that anything my computer could do. There is a point when they just become greedy though, but where that point sits is debatable.
i agree with you but almost doubling the price is plain greed, a couple of pound on every game sold is more than enough to recoup the costs when you think how many copies of each games are sold, it certainly doesn't justify 10+ and not the 20 to 30 that i currently appears to be set at, this is just plain greed and abuse of patents and copywrite.

246.3.2010 2:51

If the devs do have to pay a fixed fee for all games sold, it can't be that much. I have seen games in BestBuy for under $15, and I have seen them under $10 online. If the fee is sliding, then it still can't be that much..."The Sabateur" was $40 for both PS3 and PC just 1 day after launch. I think that the fees to sony/Microsoft/Nintendo are probably a lot smaller than the devs make them out to be...certainly not 50% or a fixed fee of $20.

256.3.2010 3:29

Console games have to pay out to NIN/Sony?MS for licensing to make a game on that console, thus why they are 10$ higher than their PC version. Its part of how the console breaks even, you get a fee from games and you get a profit from hardware sales after the first few million units are out IE first 20 million units you are in debt, then the next 20 units you may break even then after that you are printing money. Though nintendo made money from the start on the WII.

267.3.2010 12:12

You guys need to enjoy it while it lasts. Piracy will be a thing of the past once computers and internet get a little faster. You probably won't be able to "download" the game anymore. If all games played were online, piracy would be dead. Who's REALLY playing a "cracked" version of World of Warcraft? No one. Get what you can because soon it will be gone.

277.3.2010 12:31
WierdName
Inactive

Originally posted by edsrouter:
You guys need to enjoy it while it lasts. Piracy will be a thing of the past once computers and internet get a little faster. You probably won't be able to "download" the game anymore. If all games played were online, piracy would be dead. Who's REALLY playing a "cracked" version of World of Warcraft? No one. Get what you can because soon it will be gone.
I must respectfully disagree. While it is starting to become more and more difficult for pirates to get around online authorization, offlines games are still here and probably will be for awhile. Not everyone likes to play solely online. I myself play offline sometimes because it's just more leisurely. Furthermore, games like Battlefield and Call of Duty are easily cracked and played on cracked servers. So while some games have good piracy prevention, such as World of Warcraft (which I have never played), other games that aren't expanded to death don't have as much work put into them. Why pull out all the stops to stop piracy of a game that will be dead within two or three years? Also, authorization methods used by WoW require them to be played on game developers servers. All crackers have to do is get the game to work with a cracked server. So really, piracy will be around for awhile, it's just whether or not it's worth it to have use a whole other program just to get a pirated program to work. Never underestimate the ability of crackers with a big challenge. It's like a game to them.

2811.3.2010 15:10

Originally posted by WierdName:
Well this is interesting: http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/UBI?countryCode=fr
Their stock doesn't seem to be too affected... I wonder how long it will be until there is a noticeable effect. If they surprisingly don't go under, it would be a great time to buy in.
down over 1% in one day
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 11 Mar 2010 @ 15:14

2911.3.2010 15:29

as for the download/drm controversy.... it will fade when Christ returns but it will never be of any significance...

it is impossible to make a bulletproof lock and thus the more you try the stupider you look... especially with 99% getting a ZERO DAY crack (I think that hex code, controversial due to the legal implications, that breaks movie DRM took a few days but will work for decades... other than it I haven't heard of a DRM scheme that avoided a crack in less than 36 hours)

3011.3.2010 16:44
WierdName
Inactive

Quote:
Originally posted by WierdName:
Well this is interesting: http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/UBI?countryCode=fr
Their stock doesn't seem to be too affected... I wonder how long it will be until there is a noticeable effect. If they surprisingly don't go under, it would be a great time to buy in.
down over 1% in one day
Check when I posted that, it was actually going up then. Now it's dropping again.

3113.3.2010 21:23

All you people who are saying piracy will never die are fooling themselves. What if you never have the code or hex to "crack". Once the internet catches up to the speeds in South Korea for example, piracy is done. Cloud computing will not even give you the need for anyone to "download" software at all. If you can have speeds that can download a full length movie in a second, piracy is through. Plain and simple. I'm not an advocate, I'm just saying think logically people.

3213.3.2010 21:31

Originally posted by edsrouter:
All you people who are saying piracy will never die are fooling themselves. What if you never have the code or hex to "crack". Once the internet catches up to the speeds in South Korea for example, piracy is done. Cloud computing will not even give you the need for anyone to "download" software at all. If you can have speeds that can download a full length movie in a second, piracy is through. Plain and simple. I'm not an advocate, I'm just saying think logically people.

..... steam and wow are examples of cloud computing....and they are hacked, most MMOs are cloud computing...they are hacked.... the only way to stop piracy is with a tried internet Gov(highest authority for the area)>net authority(world wide security force that polices the ent based on location like Interpol)>business(at the top of this is banks and credit institutions and the low end common commerce)>individuals that would be you and me.

In order to build this new internet the current way of funding it is to charge site owners and individuals ALOT MORE for stable speeds.

So untill they come out with a new layered protocol system that dose not bend over both the end user and the content seller alike its not going to happen....

3313.3.2010 21:32
WierdName
Inactive

Originally posted by edsrouter:
All you people who are saying piracy will never die are fooling themselves. What if you never have the code or hex to "crack". Once the internet catches up to the speeds in South Korea for example, piracy is done. Cloud computing will not even give you the need for anyone to "download" software at all. If you can have speeds that can download a full length movie in a second, piracy is through. Plain and simple. I'm not an advocate, I'm just saying think logically people.
I think you're underestimating the will of pirates. Streaming or not, you will still need to pay to access the media. Plus there will still be people without constant internet access who will need physical media. People today are still on dial-up if they have internet at all. But ignoring that and looking at streaming, methods might be developed to capture streaming or someone might leak the code to setup private pirate servers. Traditional cracking or not, pirating isn't about to die anytime soon.

3414.3.2010 17:24

i am curious about this "incomplete" claim.

there are other games that become partially disabled when cracked. the most recent batman game had an issue where a player function was disabled if the game was cracked. yes it was later fixed i believe but still.

companies are getting smarter. it could be possible in game content is locked out when certain keys and or values are not received from the always online connection. as well as some bits and pieces of game play could need to be downloaded on the fly to be played but are not there with cracked version. simply theory of what IS possible.

and i should maybe say companies are more clever. DRM is clever but not smart. catch my drift.

the one simple way of making piracy go away is make entertainment affordable. if games cost 20 to 40 depending on playable value i would go for it. as well as resell value. they seem to be trying to take away the used game market completely now.

3514.3.2010 17:39

Originally posted by senator29:
i am curious about this "incomplete" claim.

there are other games that become partially disabled when cracked. the most recent batman game had an issue where a player function was disabled if the game was cracked. yes it was later fixed i believe but still.

companies are getting smarter. it could be possible in game content is locked out when certain keys and or values are not received from the always online connection. as well as some bits and pieces of game play could need to be downloaded on the fly to be played but are not there with cracked version. simply theory of what IS possible.

and i should maybe say companies are more clever. DRM is clever but not smart. catch my drift.

the one simple way of making piracy go away is make entertainment affordable. if games cost 20 to 40 depending on playable value i would go for it. as well as resell value. they seem to be trying to take away the used game market completely now.
Well there's only so many ways you can do the same trick, when a pub or DRM maker is knowen to pull those tricks the crckers will finish the game to be sure its been cracked right, also they respond to support requests faster than the slave driving pubs do..... so meh it all works out.

I think onlive is going to push gaming into the subscription market like TV if not that then most games will be priced at 5$ in 10 or so years, it would not be such a stretch to think as pubs gobble pubs TV and gaming will be in one basket and with every 7 in 10 homes having cheap ultra net its a no brainier.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 14 Mar 2010 @ 18:21

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